Effie Athanassopoulos

Dr. Effie Athanassopoulos

Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, 1993

Associate Professor of Anthropology and Classics

Graduate Advisor

Office: 935 Oldfather Hall
Email: efa@unl.edu
Phone: (402) 472-0172
Fax: (402) 472-9642

Subfield:

Archaeology

Major Research Interests:

Landscape archaeology, historical archaeology, Europe and the Mediterranean, archaeology and identity formation, digital archaeology.

Educational Background:

Ph.D., 1993, Anthropology Department, University of Pennsylvania
1980-82, Graduate Program in Classical Archaeology, University of Pennsylvania
B.A.1979, Department of History and Archaeology, University of Athens, Greece

Recent Peer Reviewed Publications:

“Landscape Archaeology and the Medieval Countryside: Results of the Nemea Valley Archaeological Project.” Completed Monograph, accepted for publication by the American School of Classical Studies Publications, Princeton, NJ. Hesperia Supplement. In press.

“Byzantine Monuments and Architectural Cleansing in 19th century Athens.” InLa présence de Byzance dans l’Europe du Sud-Est aux époques moderne et contemporaine. Actes du colloque d’Athènes (22-24 September 2008), Olivier Delouis, ed. École française d'Athènes. In press.

“Landscape Archaeology and the Medieval Countryside: Resettlement and Abandonment in the Nemea Region.” International Journal of Historical Archaeology, Special issue on the “Abandonment and (Re) Settlement of the Post-Classical Countryside in Greece and Albania.”  IJHA 14: 255-270. 2010.

 “Medieval Archaeology in Greece: A Historical Overview.” In Archaeology and History in Roman, Medieval and Post Medieval Greece: Studies on Method and Meaning in Honor of Timothy E. Gregory, W. Caraher, L. Jones Hall, and S. Moore, eds., pp. 15-35. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Publishing. 2008.

Athanassopoulos, Effie and LuAnn Wandsnider, eds.
“Mediterranean Archaeological Landscapes: Current Issues.” Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Museum Publications. 2004.

 “Historical Archaeology of Medieval Mediterranean Landscapes.” In Mediterranean Archaeological Landscapes: Current Issues, E. F. Athanassopoulos and L. Wandsnider, eds., pp. 81-98. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Museum Publications. 2004.

Athanassopoulos, Effie and LuAnn Wandsnider
“Mediterranean Landscape Archaeology Past and Present.” In Mediterranean Archaeological Landscapes: Current Issues, E. F. Athanassopoulos and L. Wandsnider, eds., pp. 1-13. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Museum Publications. 2004.

“An Ancient Landscape: European Ideals, Archaeology and Nation Building in Early Modern Greece.” Journal of Modern Greek Studies 20:273-305. 2002.

Book Reviews:

Review of “Fauvel: The First Archaeologist in Athens and his Philhellenic Correspondents” by Christoph W. Clairmont, Akanthus, 2007. Published in the Journal of Hellenic Studies, vol. 131, pp. 301-302. 2011.

Review of “Historical Archaeology of the Ottoman Empire: Breaking New Groundedited by Uzi Baram and Lynda Carroll, 2000, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, NY. American Antiquity 67(1):182-3. 2002.

Recent Conference Papers:

The Sanctuary of Zeus at Nemea: The Medieval Deposits.” Paper in panel “Current Research at Nemea: New Finds and New Insights”. Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, January 5-8, 2012, Philadelphia, PA.

Classical vs. Byzantine pasts in the Nineteenth Century: Athenian Monuments and Archaeological Practice.” International Conference “Re-imagining the Past: Antiquity and Modern Greek Culture.” University of Birmingham, UK, Institute of Archaeology and Antiquity, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies, June 27-28, 2011. www.reimaginingthepast.bham.ac.uk
Co-organizer of panel “From Town to Country: The Archaeology of Modern Greek Landscapes.”  Modern Greek Studies Association Symposium, October 15-17, 2009, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada.

“Athens in the 19th Century: Archaeological Landscapes and Competing Pasts.” Paper presented at the Modern Greek Studies Association Symposium, October 15-17, 2009, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada.

“Byzantium and Archaeological Practice in 19th century Greece.” Paper presented at Conference “The Presence of Byzantium in Modern and Contemporary Southeastern Europe.” Organized by the French Shcool of Archaeology, Athens, Greece, September 22-24, 2008.

“Landscape Archaeology and the Medieval Countryside: Resettlement and Abandonment in the Nemea Region.” Paper presented in the 108th Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, January 4-7, 2007, San Diego, CA.

 “Archaeological Landscapes, Mentalités and National Ideals in 19th Century Greece.” Paper presented in the 70th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, March 30-April 3, 2005, Salt Lake City, Utah.

 “Archaeology and the Excluded Past: Classical vs. Byzantine Monuments of 19th century Athens.” Paper presented in the 105th Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, January 2-5, 2004, San Francisco, CA.

Research

I have been conducting research in landscape archaeology and the interface between archaeological and historical data. The focus of this project has been the analysis and interpretation of the medieval archaeological data from the Nemea Valley Archaeological Project (NVAP). The region of Nemea is located in the NE Peloponnesos, Greece. The project is sponsored by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA). The outcome of this research is a monograph titled “Landscape Archaeology and the Medieval Countryside: Results of the Nemea Valley Archaeological Project.” It has been accepted for publication by the ASCSA Publications. The book will appear as a Hesperia Supplement. It contains a large amount of previously unpublished primary data presented in a rich historical context, integrating textual and material evidence.

My work in Nemea has entered a new phase through my participation in the research and publication program of the Nemea Center for Classical Archaeology, University of California, Berkeley. I am currently analyzing the medieval deposits from the excavations at the Sanctuary of Zeus and Stadium in Nemea. The excavations have produced substantial evidence for occupation during the 12th-13th centuries A.D. Farming activities were extensive; farming plots, an irrigation ditch, agricultural implements, ceramics, and coins of this period have been found throughout the area. Two domestic structures and numerous pits were uncovered during the excavations. The systematic study of the medieval deposits from the Sanctuary and the Stadium will provide a better understanding of the spatial distribution of these activities. Selected deposits of coarse and fine wares are being studied in order to refine the chronology of well-represented styles. The excavated medieval material will be combined with the survey evidence of the Nemea Valley Archaeological Project in order to reconstruct land use, settlement, and other activities in the Sanctuary of Zeus and its vicinity.

Another area I have been conducting research is the historical development of archaeology and its relation to the process of Western identity formation. Of particular interest are questions of cultural continuity and the role archaeology had to play in the process of Greek nation building in the 19th century. My work in this area continues to evolve with conference presentations and publications and plans for a monograph which will examine the changing role of archaeology in the formation of Greek national identity in the course of the 19th century.

Research Links:

The Nemea Valley Archaeological Project
Internet Edition, sponsored by Bryn Mawr College
http://www.brynmawr.edu/archaeology/NVAP/Index.htm

Nemea Center, University of California, Berkeley
http://nemeacenter.berkeley.edu/

UCARE Projects

UCARE grant, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, (1st year 2012-13) Kristina Whitney, an Anthropology major, came to Nemea during the summer of 2012 to assist in the analysis of the medieval deposits from the excavations of the Sanctuary of Zeus.

UCARE grant, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, (1st year, 2008-09, 2nd year 2009-2010) Maria Bender, a Classics major, was supported to work under my supervision on the topic “Ian Campbell’s Archaeological Photographs.” Honors thesis "Archaeological Photography and Site Transformation: Pompeii in the Past 100 Years."

UCARE grant, University of Nebraska-Lincoln (1st year, 2000-01, 2nd year, 2001-2002 ). Jennifer Farrell-Glaubius, an Anthropology and Classics major, was supported by the program to work under my supervision on the topic of her thesis “Agricultural Estates in Ancient Greece”. In the year 2001-02 Jennifer assisted with the analysis of the data from the archaeological field project “Amphora Production, Agriculture and Trade: The Alonissos Archaeological Project”.

Courses Taught:

Introduction to Anthropology (Anthropology 110)
Archaeology of World Civilizations (Anthropology 252-Classics 252)
The Medieval World: Byzantium (Classics 315-History 315)
The Classical World: Archaeology and Texts (Classics 320)
Old World Prehistory: Archaeology of Europe (Anthropology 438/838-Classics 438/838)
Historical Archaeology: Current Topics (Anthropology 431/831)
Seminar: Archaeology and Cultural Identity (Anthropology 935)
Archaeological Field School