Specialty Schools

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Specialty Schools & Internships

Airborne

Air Assault

Mountain Warfare

Northern Warfare

Leader's Training Course

Leader Development and Assessment Course

Cadet Troop Leadership Training

Airborne

The US Army Airborne School is at the US Army Infantry Center, Ft. Benning Georgia. This course is designed to train soldiers to become paratroopers. It develops the student's confidence through repetitious training so that the student can overcome the natural fear of jumping from an airplane; develop and maintain the high level of physical fitness required of a paratrooper, by rigorous and progressive physical training. Each student must satisfactorily complete 5 jumps from an aircraft while in flight. A cadet obtains a slot in Airborne School by virtue of his/her performance during the school year. The battalion usually receives 3-5 slots per year. Only the most qualified and motivated cadets will be selected to attend the course.

Air Assault

Air Assault school is located at several places including Fort Campbell, Kentucky, Fort Drum, New York, Camp Smith, USMA, and overseas in Germany and Hawaii. This school is an intense, 10 day course designed to give leaders a basic understanding of Army helicopter missions. There is some class room instruction, but it is mostly hands-on and performance oriented. It is broken down into four phases: Pathfinder operations, slingload operations, rappelling phase, and foot march phase. A cadet obtains a slot in Air Assault by virtue of his/her performance during the school year. The battalion usually receives 0-1 slots per year. Only the most qualified and motivated cadets will be selected to attend the course.

Mountain Warfare

Mountain Warfare School is at Ethan Allen Firing Range, in Jericho Vermont, of the Vermont National Guard. This course is designed to teach/familiarize cadets with mountain operations. It will challenge you both physically and mentally. Training is nonstop, 16 hours per day for 14 days. It tests your physical strength by forcing you to carry a 45-65 pound rucksack for 2-5 miles a day in mountainous terrain and mentally by testing your day and night land navigation skills.

Northern Warfare

Northern Warfare School is taught at the Northern Warfare Training Center in Fort Greely, Alaska. The course is designed to familiarize selected cadets with the skills required for movement in mountainous terrain and cold regions during summer months. Emphasis is placed on basic military mountaineering skills and river operations on the inland waterways. A cadet obtains a slot in Northern Warfare School by virtue of his/her performance during the school year. The battalion usually receives 0-1 slots per year. Only the most qualified and motivated cadets will be selected to attend the course.

Leader's Training Course

Students who wish to join Army ROTC later in their academic career, may choose to attend the Leader's Training Course to receive credit for the freshman and sophomore classes. Twenty-eight days in length, normally done between a new cadet's sophomore and junior year, the Leader's Training Course is designed to develop the skills necessary to enter the ROTC Advanced Course, while simultaneously presenting you with both physical and mental challenges. Trainees will have the opportunity to meet college students in a similar situation as themselves and develop lifelong relationships. The course is conducted in three phases. Future Leader - During the "Future Leader" phase you'll rappel, participate in a leadership reaction course, learn water survival and stream crossing techniques, first aid, weapons and how to navigate on land using a map and compass during the day and night. You'll be challenged physically throughout this entire phase. You'll learn when to lead and when and how to follow. Bold Leader - During phase two, the "Bold Leader" phase we'll teach you small unit tactics. We'll put you through a self confidence building obstacle course, rock climbing, paintball and the Tarzan assault course. With your newly established confidence in water survival you'll participate in small boat or raft operations. Additionally, this phase highlights the importance of teamwork and a balanced lifestyle of work and recreation. Discover Gold - Finally, during the "Discover Gold" phase you'll participate in some very entertaining social events, a family day and the culmination of the course -- the graduation ceremony.

Leader Development and Assessment Course

All ROTC cadets must complete The Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) prior to receiving a commission. LDAC is normally attended the summer between the junior and senior year. It is held at Fort Lewis, WA. Cadets spend 32 days applying the leadership and tactical skills they acquired on campus. ROTC Leader Development and Assessment Course is the most important training event for an Army ROTC cadet or National Guard Officer Candidate. The camp incorporates a wide range of subjects designed to develop and evaluate leadership ability. The challenges are rigorous and demanding, both mentally and physically. LDAC tests intelligence, common sense, ingenuity and stamina. These challenges provide a new perspective on an individual's ability to perform exacting tasks and to make difficult decisions in demanding situations. The camp places each cadet and officer candidate in a variety of leadership positions, many of which simulate stressful combat situations. In each position, cadets are evaluated by platoon tactical and counseling (TAC) officers and noncommissioned officers. In addition to proving their leadership ability, cadets and officer candidates must meet established standards in physical fitness, weapons training, communication, combat patrols and demonstrate their proficiency in many other military skills. Cadets and officer candidates must excel at camp to be considered competitive for a commission as an Army officer.

Cadet Troop Leadership Training

Cadet Troop Leadership Training (CTLT) is a program offered to ROTC cadets after the completion of Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) that is designed to teach them about life as an officer in the regular Army. Cadets are assigned to active duty Army units as platoon leaders and execute the responsibilities of second lieutenants. Cadets usually spend three weeks at CTLT if they are assigned to a unit in the US or four weeks if they are assigned to a unit in either Germany or South Korea . They interact with officers and and participate in the everyday operations of the unit to which they are assigned. This unique program offers cadets a chance to experience what it will be like when they are commissioned as Second Lieutenants. A cadet obtains a slot to attend CTLT if he has successfully completed Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) and has been selected by the Professor of Military Science. This selection is usually based upon an order of merit list.

Go to the Cadet Troop Leader Training Internship Program website for Internship opportunities.

Sunset at FTXdrill and ceremony Receiving Instrctions on 9-Line Med Evac FTX Guidon Bearer Formation lab laser tag Bus Ride to FTX joint service field meet