Course Description Booklet

FALL 2006

This is the final list of courses. 
There will be a course description update in February.

UPDATED August 22, 2006

Classics:
CLAS 180, Sec. 150 - Classical Mythology
CLAS 180, Sec. 250 - Classical Mythology
CLAS 183 - Heroes, Harlots and Helots
CLAS 233 - Science in the Classical World
CLAS 252 - Archaeology: World Civilization
CLAS 283 - Epic Tales
CLAS 399 - Independent Study
CLAS 399H - Honors Course

Greek:
GREK 101 - Elementary Greek I
GREK 372 - Plato
GREK 399 - Independent Study
GREK 399H - Honors Course
GREK 491/891 - Topics in Greek Prose
GREK 896 - Reading and Research
GREK 899 - Masters Thesis
GREK 961 - Seminar in Greek Literature

Latin:
LATN 101 - Elementary Latin
LATN 301 - Latin Prose
LATN 303 - Latin Prose
LATN 399 - Independent Study
LATN 399H - Honors Course
LATN 456/856 - Latin of the Middle Ages: John Wyclif
LATN 896 - Reading and Research
LATN 899 - Masters Thesis
LATN 941 - Seminar in Latin Literature

Hebrew:
HEBR 201 - Biblical Hebrew Prose
HEBR 399 - Independent Study
HEBR 896 - Reading and Research

Religious Studies:
RELG 120W - World Religions
RELG 150 - Explaining Religion
RELG 181 - Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
RELG 189H - Univ. Honors: Jesus Then and Now
RELG 306 - 2nd Temple Judaism
RELG 318 - Islam in the Modern World - See Room Change
RELG 398 - Special Topics: Arabic
RELG 399 - Independent Study



CLAS 180, Sec. 150 - CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY   Instructor Schedule and Office Hours
Call# Type Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
2455 Lecture A 3 150 1230p-0120p MF LL 102 T. Winter
2456 Recitation A -- 151 0930a-1020a R And 11 Lisa Bunge
2457 Recitation A -- 152 1230p-0120p W OldH 203 Alecia Rolling
2458 Recitation A -- 153 0330p-0420p W Burn 119 Lisa Bunge
2459 Recitation A -- 154 1230p-0120p W OldH 305 Chris Slane
2460 Recitation A -- 155 0330p-0420p R OldH 205 Chris Slane
8988 Recitation A -- 156 0330p-0420p W OldH 305 Alecia Rolling
2461 Recitation A -- 157 1030a-1120a W OldH 305 Alecia Rolling
8989 Recitation A -- 158 0330p-0420p R OldH 305 Lisa Bunge
NOTE:   Register for one recitation from sections 151-158 with lecture section 150. 
Description of Material Being Covered (Sec. 150) This course, in this section, defines archetypal mythology as primitive software for understanding the natural world. The seven texts have an age ranging from about 4,000 to 1,900 years, and we will treat each one as a time capsule to help us understand the times, the people, the cultures, and the modes of thought that produced them and left them for us to find.
Required Books (Sec. 150)
Danny P. Jackson, The Epic of Gilgamesh, (tr. Gardner & Maier), ISBN: 0-86516-352-9, Bolchazy-Carducci, 1997;
Homer, The Odyssey, (tr. Cook), ISBN: 0-393-00744-8, Norton, 1968;
Sophocles, Three Theban Plays, (tr. Fagles), ISBN: 0-14-044425-4, Penguin, 2000;
Euripides, Ten Plays, (tr. Hadas), ISBN: 0-553-21363-6, Bantam, 1960;
Apollodorus, The Library of Greek Mythology, ISBN: 0-19-283924-1, Oxford;
Ovid, Metamorphoses, (tr. Humphries), ISBN: 0-253-20001-6, Indiana UP;
Vergil, Vergil's Aeneid,, (tr. Cobbold), ISBN: 0-86516-596-3, Bolchazy-Carducci, 2005.
Method of Instruction (Sec. 150) Backgrounders to help explain the readings and to put them in a setting, plus hundreds of slides.
Number and Types of Assignments (Sec. 150) Daily reading of assigned works and 2 short papers.
Examination Policies and Grading Information (Sec. 150) Each of the two hour examinations will count for 25% of the grade. The essay will count for 15% of the grade. Attendance, quizzes, and participation in recitation sections will count for 35% of the grade.
96-100 = A+, 90-95.9 = A, 87.5-89 = B+, 80-87.4 = B, 77.5-79 = C+, 70-77.4 = C, 67.5-69 = D+, 60-67.4 = D. Rounding? 9.445 rounds up--9.444 does not.

CLAS 180, Sec. 250 - CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY 
Call# Type Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
2462 Lecture B 3 250 1100a-1150a TR OTHM 106 R. Gorman
2463 Recitation B -- 251 1030a-1120a W M&N 203 Matt Meyer
2464 Recitation B -- 254 0330p-0420p W OldH 204 Matt Meyer
2465 Recitation B -- 255 1130a-1220p W OldH 209 Matt Meyer
NOTE:   Register for one recitation from sections 251, 254 or 255 with lecture section 250. 
Description of Material Being Covered (Sec. 250) This course provides an introduction to the study of mythology as a cultural phenomenon. This study will be based on reading in English of ancient Greek texts of the archaic period and discussions about myths in texts from the Roman period. As this course counts toward fulfillment of the Integrative Studies requirement, emphasis will be placed upon examination of the use of myths to create, validate, justify, transmit, and question societal norms, values, and institutions. This focus will encourage the student to turn a critical eye towards the stories we tell in order to maintain (or change) our own society.
Required Texts (Sec. 250)
Athanassakis, Apostolos N., The Homeric Hymns, ISBN: 0-8018-7983-3, John Hopkins UP, 2004;
Cicero, The Nature of the Gods, (trans. Walsh), ISBN: 0-19-282511-9, Oxford UP, 1998;
Hesiod, Theogony, Works and Days, (trans. West), ISBN: 0-19-283941-1, Oxford UP, 1999;
Homer, The Iliad, (trans. Lombardo), ISBN: 0-87220-352-2, Hackett Pub. Co., 1997.
Method of Instruction (Sec. 250) To be announced.
Number and Types of Assignments (Sec. 250) To be announced.
Examination Policies and Grading Information (Sec. 250) To be announced.
Description of Material Being Covered Heroes, Harlots and Helots offers students a different approach to learning about the ancient world. Relying upon the most recent research in the field, students will be introduced to this exciting area of study by examining the many sides of private life among the ancients. The division between public and private was perhaps the most fundamental idea which underlay the organization of society in the ancient world. Though often overlooked in courses on ancient civilizations, the importance of the private sphere was such that no one can adequately understand the public actions and achievements of the Greeks and the Romans, without a thorough familiarity with their private lives. In Heroes, Harlots and Helots students will learn about these lives in all their fascinating details. Topics of study will include:  the family as the economic basis of ancient life; the roles of men at home and at war; slavery; the lives of women; family-centered religious practices; sex and sexuality; and children and education. Students will learn to draw on the evidence of literature, archaeology and art to fashion for themselves a sophisticated and richly textured picture of the ancient world.
Required Books
Mary R. Lefkowitz & Maureen B. Fant, Women's Life in Greece and Rome: A Source Book in Translation, ISBN: 0-8018-8310-5, John Hopkins UP, 2005;
Thomas Wiedemann, Greek and Roman Slavery, ISBN: 0-415-02972-4, Routledge, 1989;
Frank M. Snowden, Before Color Prejudice: The Ancient View of Blacks, ISBN: 0-674-06381-3, Harvard UP, 1991.
Method of Instruction Lecture and discussion.
Number and Types of Assignments To be announced.
Examination Policies and Grading Information To be announced.

CLAS 183 - Heroes, Harlots and Helots
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
7786 3 001 1230p-0145p TR And 11 R. Gorman
Description of Material Being Covered Heroes, Harlots and Helots offers students a different approach to learning about the ancient world. Relying upon the most recent research in the field, students will be introduced to this exciting area of study by examining the many sides of private life among the ancients. The division between public and private was perhaps the most fundamental idea which underlay the organization of society in the ancient world. Though often overlooked in courses on ancient civilizations, the importance of the private sphere was such that no one can adequately understand the public actions and achievements of the Greeks and the Romans, without a thorough familiarity with their private lives. In Heroes, Harlots and Helots students will learn about these lives in all their fascinating details. Topics of study will include:  the family as the economic basis of ancient life; the roles of men at home and at war; slavery; the lives of women; family-centered religious practices; sex and sexuality; and children and education. Students will learn to draw on the evidence of literature, archaeology and art to fashion for themselves a sophisticated and richly textured picture of the ancient world.
Required Books
Mary R. Lefkowitz & Maureen B. Fant, Women's Life in Greece and Rome: A Source Book in Translation, ISBN: 0-8018-8310-5, John Hopkins UP, 2005;
Thomas Wiedemann, Greek and Roman Slavery, ISBN: 0-415-02972-4, Routledge, 1989;
Frank M. Snowden, Before Color Prejudice: The Ancient View of Blacks, ISBN: 0-674-06381-3, Harvard UP, 1991.
Method of Instruction Lecture and discussion.
Number and Types of Assignments To be announced.
Examination Policies and Grading Information To be announced.

CLAS 233 - SCIENCE IN THE CLASSICAL WORLD 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
7785 3 001 1030a-1120a MWF Burn 204 T. Winter
PREQ:   Sophomore standing. 
Description of Material Being Covered This course deals with Greek concepts of the natural and physical world, and looks with deep perspective at the interplay of technological development and cultural change. As now taught, it uses one general history of science and three book-length primary sources to see, for instance, Aristotle struggle with physics and mechanics in a time before pi, a time before inertia, a time before mechanical advantage, a time before the understanding of second-degree and third-degree levers; to see ancient medical writers attempt a unified theory of disease in a time before the microscope; and finally, in Vitruvius to see a Roman comprehension and synthesis of this understanding of the natural and physical world. In addition to subjects based on readings, the professor will present materials for which a good ancient written source does not exist but where the surviving materials themselves are the source. (e.g. the development of the lathe, the development of ancient metalwork, and others).
Required Books
G. Irby-Massie, Greek Science of the Hellenistic Era: A Sourcebook, ISBN: 0-415-23848-X, Routledge, 2001;
Benjamin Farrington, Greek Science: Its Meaning For Us, ISBN: 0-85124-631-1, Coronet Books, 2000;
Artistotle, Minor Works (Loeb Class Lib #307), ISBN: 0-674-99338-1, Harvard UP, 1963;
G.E.R. Lloyd, Hippocratic Writings, ISBN: 0-14-044451-3, Penguin, 1984;
Lucretius, The Way Things Are, ISBN: 0-253-20125-X, Indiana UP, 1968;
Vitruvius, The Ten Books on Architecture, ISBN: 0-486-20645-9, Dover Pub., 1960.
(It should be noted that when a Roman said architectura our "civil engineering" was meant.)
Method of Instruction Lectures, slides, demonstrations.
Number and Types of Assignments The students typically substitute a short paper (3 pages) for one of the quizzes. Also, each student is required to do individual research which results either in an essay of about 10 pages, or a project.
Examination Policies and Grading Information Bi-weekly quizzes and a final examination.

CLAS 252 - ARCHAEOLOGY:  WORLD CIVILIZATION 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
2469 3 001 1100p-1215p TR ANDN 109 C. Sanchez
Cross-Listed with Anthropology 252. 
Description of Material Being Covered An introduction to the study of complex societies, called civilizations, in both the Old and the New Worlds. Examines anthropological theories and models dealing with the evolution of cultural complexity and reviews archaeological data from specific regions, e.g. Near East, Far East, Mediterranean, Europe, Mesoamerica, Peru, etc.
Required Books
To be announced.
Method of Instruction To be announced.
Number and Types of Assignments To be announced.
Examination Policies and Grading Information To be announced.

CLAS 283 - EPIC TALES 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
7787 3 001 0230p-0320p MWF And 11 T. Rinkevich
PREQ:   Sophmore standing. 
Description of Material Being Covered:   Reading and discussion of selected representative epics from a variety of cultures, chiefly in the ancient world: including Gilgamesh, Iliad, Odyssey, Theogony, Enuma Elish, Mahabharata (selections!), Aeneid. Investigation and lectures regarding the themes, motifs, and structures of epic, and their appearance in other cultures (including later) epics.
Required Books:  
Lombardo, S. (tr.), Iliad, ISBN: 0-87220-352-2, Hackett Pub. Co., 1997;
West, David (tr.), Aeneid: New Prose Translation, ISBN: 0-14-044932-7, Penguin, 2003;
Gardner, J., Gilgamesh, ISBN: 0-394-74089-0, Random Books, 1985;
Johnson, John W., The Epic of Son-Jara, ISBN: 0-253-20713-4, Indiana Univ. Press, 1994;
Heaney, Seamus, Beowulf, ISBN: 0-393-32097-9, W.W. Norton, 2001;
Homer, Odyssey, (tr. Walter Shewring), ISBN: 0-19-283375-8, Oxford Univ. Press, 1998;
Hesiod Theogony and Works and Days, (ed. West), ISBN: 0-19-283941-1, Oxford Univ. Press, 1999;
Dalley, Stephanie, Myths from Mesopotamia, ISBN: 0-19-283589-0, Oxford Univ. Press, 1998;
Chakravarthi V. Narassimhan, Mahabharata: An English Version, ISBN: 0-231-11055-3, Columbia Univ. Press, 1997;
Nabokov, Vladimir (tr.), The Song of Igor's Campaign, ISBN: 0-87501-061-X, Ardis Publishers, 1989.
Method of Instruction:  Lectures and class discussions on these works; oral presentations in class by members of the class.
Number and Types of Assignments To be announced.
Examination Policies and Grading Information Occasional quizzes; mid-term, final; 2-3 short papers (2-4 pages) on the readings. Quizzes count 10%, mid-term 25%, final 25%, papers 30%, attendance and participation 10%. Performance counts!.

CLAS 399 - INDEPENDENT STUDY 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
**** 1-6 001 Arranged Arranged Arranged Staff
PREQ:   Permission of Instructor. Obtain call # from the Classics office (472-2460). 

CLAS 399H - HONORS COURSE 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
**** 1-4 001 Arranged Arranged Arranged Staff
PREQ:   Candidate for degree with distinction or with high distinction or with highest distinction in the College of Arts and Sciences. Obtain call # from Classics office (472-2460) 

GREK 101 - ELEMENTARY GREEK I 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
3845 5 001 1130a-1220p MTWRF M&N B7 T. Rinkevich
Description of Material Being Covered This course will lay the foundation of Classical and Koine Greek; the grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and structure of the language.
Required Books
J.A. Kleist, Kaegi's Greek Grammar, ISBN: 0-86516-281-6, Bolchazy-Carducci, 1995, Required;
A Kaegi, J.A., Kleist, Greek Readings for Review: First Lessons in Greek, ISBN: 0-86516-549-1, Bolchazy-Carducci, 2002, Required;
and a Recommended book: H.G. Liddell, A Lexicon: Abridged from Liddell and Scott's Greek-English Lexicon, ISBN: 0-19-910207-4, Oxford UP, 1966.
Method of Instruction
1) Every student will have the opportunity to contribute to every class session. This course is not for the faint-hearted or the slack-offs, but it will produce real benefits for those who take it seriously, and efforts will be made to make it a pleasant experience.
2) Presentation and explanation of vocabulary, grammar, syntax and structure; in-class and homework exercises.
Number and Types of Assignments 2 chapters a week, each with exercises and sentences to be handed in, or assigned for quizzes; a quiz or assignment nearly every day.
Examination Policies and Grading Information Thorough daily drills and frequent quizzes; 90-100 = A, 86-89 = B+, etc. Mid-term and final.

GREK 372 - PLATO 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
7777 3 001 0930a-1020a MWF AND 241 N. Adkin
Description of Material Being CoveredPlato's Apology of Socrates or: 'Don't kill the wisest, and wittiest, of mortals!'.
Required Books
James J. Helm, Plato: Apology, ISBN: 0-86516-348-0, Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, 1997;
Recommended: H.G. Liddell and Robert Scott, An Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon, ISBN: 0-19-910206-6, Oxford UP, 1945.
Method of Instruction Daily translation and analysis of grammatical structures.
Number and Types of Assignments Daily reading assignments.
Examination Policies and Grading Information The course grade will be based on quizzes, mid-term and final.

GREK 399 - INDEPENDENT STUDY 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
**** 1-6 001 Arranged Arranged Arranged Staff
PREQ:   Permission of Instructor. Obtain call # from the Classics office (472-2460). 

GREK 399H - HONORS COURSE 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
**** 3 001 Arranged Arranged Arranged Staff
PREQ:   Candidate for degree with distinction or with high distinction or with highest distinction in the College of Arts and Sciences. Obtain call # from Classics office (472-2460) 

GREK 491/891 - TOPICS IN GREEK PROSE 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
3849/3850 3 001 0330p-0600p M And 241 T. Winter
NOTE:  Greek 491 can be repeated for credit towards the degree. 
Description of Material Being Covered To be announced.
Required Books
To be announced.
Method of Instruction To be announced.
Number and Types of Assignments To be announced.
Examination Policies and Grading Information To be announced.

GREK 896 - READING AND RESEARCH 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
**** 1-6 001 Arranged Arranged Arranged Staff
PREQ:   Permission of Instructor. Obtain call # from the Classics office (472-2460). 

GREK 899 - MASTERS THESIS 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
3852 1-10 001 Arranged Arranged Arranged Staff
PREQ:  Admission to the Masters Degree Program and permission of Major Advisor. 

GREK 961 - SEMINAR IN GREEK LITERATURE 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
3853 3 001 Arranged Arranged Arranged Staff

LATN 101 - ELEMENTARY LATIN 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
4285 5 001 1030a-1120a MTWRF AND 11 S. Lahey
4286 5 002 0230p-0320p MTWRF OLDH 205 R. Gorman
The Use of Latin for Today's Student For fifteen hundred years or more the Latin language was the life-blood of the intellectual development of western Europe. Subjects as diverse as history, government, law, rhetoric, literature, philosophy, religion, medicine, physics, astronomy and mathematics were written about, talked about and thought about in Latin. For people of that time, not to know Latin was to be largely cut off from the life of the mind. Likewise, for students of today, to lack all knowledge of Latin language and culture is to remain forever intellectually "childish": enjoying the fruits and suffering the consequences of our intellectual heritage without even recognition or acknowledgment, not to mention insight and understanding. In addition to its place as an invaluable key to the story of intellectual development in the West, knowledge of Latin may help to unlock for the student much of the modern world as well. In a vast swath across our planet, from the southern tip of South America to the coast of the Black Sea, the languages spoken are essentially Neo-Latin. Spanish, French, Italian, Romanian, Portuguese and Catalan are all directly descended from Latin. Much of the grammar, morphology, vocabulary and syntax are readily transparent to those who have studied Latin. A good Latin student can, without any further formal training, learn to read these languages with facility.
Description of Material Being CoveredAccordingly, it is the goal of the beginning Latin sequence to introduce the student to the achievements of Latin culture by the most direct route: unmediated confrontation with the monuments of Latin literature. Latin 101/102 will familiarize the student with the elements of the grammar of Classical Latin, the standard by which previous and subsequent developments in the Latin language are measured. In Latin 101 the student will learn the morphology and syntax of the Latin case system as well as a substantial part of the Latin verb system. Knowledge of morphology will be demonstrated in daily quizzes. Knowledge of both morphology and syntax will be developed and tested in daily translation exercises. The beginning Latin sequence also aims to develop in the student an increased level of linguistic sophistication. This improvement will arise not only willy-nilly from the simple fact of the learning of a second language, but is the product of a continual practice of explicit analysis of both Latin and English grammar.
Required Books
Andrew Keller & Stephanie Russell, Learn to Read Latin, ISBN: 0-300-10215-1, Yale UP, 2003;
Andrew Keller & Stephanie Russell, Learn to Read Latin: Workbook, ISBN: 0-300-10194-5, Yale UP, 2003.
Method of Instruction To be announced.
Number and Types of Assignments To be announced.
Examination Policies and Grading Information To be announced.

LATN 301 - LATIN PROSE 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
4287 3 001 1230p-0120p MWF AND 11 N. Adkin
PREQ:   Latin 102. 
Description of Material Being Covered We shall be reading Cicero's First Catilinarian, yummiest bit of all Latin eloquence .
Required Books
Karl Frerichs, Cicero's First Catilinarian Oration, ISBN: 0-86516-341-3, Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, 2000.
Method of Instruction Daily translation and analysis of grammatical structures.
Number and Types of Assignments Daily reading assignments.
Examination Policies and Grading Information The course grade will be based on quizzes, mid-term and final.

LATN 303 - LATIN PROSE 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
4288 3 001 0200p-0315p TR AND 11 T. Rinkevich
PREQ:   Latin 102. 
Description of Material Being Covered Reading and translating, with discussion, of selected prose (exempli gratia, Cato, Cicero, Caesar, Livy, et cetera.)
Required Books
D.A. Russell, An Anthology of Latin Prose, ISBN: 0-19-872121-8, Oxford UP, 1990.
Method of Instruction Reading and translating Latin passages, with continuing grammatical and syntactical analysis. Discussion of the content as well.
Number and Types of Assignments Daily assignments, frequent quizzes.
Examination Policies and Grading Information The grade in the course is the average of the daily assignments, quizzes, mid-term and final exams.

LATN 399 - INDEPENDENT STUDY 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
**** 1-6 001 Arranged Arranged Arranged Staff
PREQ:   Permission of Instructor. Obtain call # from the Classics office (472-2460). 

LATN 399H - HONORS COURSE 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
**** 3 001 Arranged Arranged Arranged Staff
PREQ:   Candidate for degree with distinction or with high distinction or with highest distinction in the College of Arts and Sciences. Obtain call # from Classics office (472-2460) 

LATN 456/856 - LATIN OF THE MIDDLE AGES:  JOHN WYCLIF
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
7778/7779 3 001 0130p-0220p MWF AND 241 S. Lahey
Description of Material Being Covered To be announced.
Required Books To be announced.
Method of InstructionTo be announced.
Number and Types of AssignmentsTo be announced.
Examination Policies and Grading InformationTo be announced.

LATN 896 - READING AND RESEARCH 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
**** 1-6 001 Arranged Arranged Arranged Staff
PREQ:   Permission of Instructor. Obtain call # from the Classics office (472-2460). 

LATN 899 - MASTERS THESIS 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
4294 1-10 001 Arranged Arranged Arranged Staff
PREQ:  Admission to the Masters Degree Program and permission of Major Advisor. 

LATN 941 - SEMINAR IN LATIN LITERATURE 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
4295 3 001 Arranged Arranged Arranged Staff

HEBR 201 - BIBLICAL HEBREW PROSE 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
7776 3 001 0200p-0315p TR AND 241 S. Crawford
Description of Material Being CoveredPassage of prose from the Hebrew Bible, and review of grammar.
Required Books
C.L. Seow, A Grammar for Biblical Hebrew, ISBN: 0-687-15786-2, Abingdon Press, 1995;
Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia 5th Edition, ISBN: 3-43805-222-9, American Bible Society, 1997;
Francis Brown, S. Driver, Briggs, A Hebrew-English Lexicon of the Old Testament, ISBN: 1-56563-206-0, Hendrickson, 1996.
Method of Instruction In-class recitation, quizzes, and examinations.
Number and Types of Assignments To be announced.
Examination Policies To be announced.

HEBR 399 - INDEPENDENT STUDY 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
**** 1-3 001 Arranged Arranged Arranged Staff
PREQ:   Permission of Instructor. Obtain call # from the Classics office (472-2460). 

HEBR 896 - READING AND RESEARCH 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
**** 1-6 001 Arranged Arranged Arranged Staff
PREQ:   Permission of Instructor. Obtain call # from the Classics office (472-2460). 

RELG 120W - WORLD RELIGIONS 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
**** 3 001 0830a-0945a TR 315 Old Main R. Lester
NOTE:   This course is taught at NE WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY. 
PREQ:   Permission from Classics office (472-2460). 
Description of Material Being Covered This course is designed to introduce the student to the major tribal and world religions. We will examine the role of myths, rituals, moral norms, leadership, identity and institutional development in various tribal (ethnic) and world (global) traditions. At the end of the course, students will have increased their awareness of the important elements of the major religions--their myth, symbols, rituals, doctrine, moral codes, and artistic expressions. You will recognize the differences among the religious traditions, better understand the religious issues and conflicts in the modern world, and deepen your appreciation of your own religious background and the religions of the community in which you live.
Required Books
Carl W. Ernst, Following Muhammed: Rethinking Islam in the Contemporary World, ISBN: 0-8078-5577-4, Univ. of NC, 2004, Required;
Stephen T. Asma, The Gods Drink Whiskey: Stumbling Toward Enlightenment in the Land of the Tattered Buddha, ISBN: 0-06-083450-1, Harper SF, 2006, Required;
Stephen P. Huyler, Meeting God: Elements in Hindu Devotion, ISBN: 0-300-08905-8, Yale UP, 2002, Required;
E. Thomas Lawson, Religions of Africa: Traditions in Transformation, ISBN: 1-57766-012-9, Waveland Press, 1998, Required.
Method of Instruction Lecture/discussion. Experiential learning.
Course Requirements It is expected that each class member will attend all meetings of the class and that each student will have read, in advance, the assigned reading for that day. The instructor reserves the right to administer unscheduled quizzes and in-class writing assignments.
Examination Policies and Grading Information There are 5 exams for this course, including a cumulative final. 5 exams (500 points), 1 World Religion in Lincoln report (100), For three or more absences, 5 points will be taken off your total points for each absence.

RELG 150 - EXPLAINING RELIGION 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
7783 3 001 0200p-0315p TR Teach 205 D. Crawford
Description of Material Being Covered The course will ask: What is religion? and answer by looking at various expressions of religious belief and practice. How is religion expressed in the religious texts, experiences, and ritual practices of the different world religions, as well as in great works of art, literature, music, and film? What is the attitude of faith, and is it a necessary component of religion? We will explore how religion reaches beyond the natural world to an ideal and sacred realm.
Required Books
Gary Kessler, Studying Religion: An Introduction Through Cases, ISBN: 0-07-298619-0, McGraw Hall, 2005;
Plato, Plato:  Euthyphro, Apology & Crito, (tr) F. J. Church, ISBN: 0-02-322410-X, Prentice Hall, 1956;
Karen Armstrong, Buddha, ISBN: 0-14-303436-7, Penguin, 2004.
Method of InstructionLecture and discussion.
Requirements Class attendance is required (with a limited number of cuts allowed). Several short papers (3-4 pages) and a final exam.

RELG 181 - SPECIAL TOPICS: JUDAISM, CHRISTIANITY AND ISLAM 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
7780 3 001 1130a-1220p MWF Henz 201 S. Burnett
Description of Material Being Covered This course will introduce the three major monotheistic religious traditions originating in the Middle East: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. We will discuss the historical origins, scriptures, beliefs and practices of each tradition and also their historical interactions up to the present.
Required Books
John Corrigan, Jews, Christians, Muslims: A Comparative Introduction to Monotheistic Religions, ISBN: 0-02-325092-5, Prentice Hall, 1997;
John Corrigan, Readings in Judaism, Christianity and Islam, ISBN: 0-02-325098-4, Prentice Hall, 1998;
Mark R. Cohen, Under Crescent and Cross: The Jews in the Middle Ages, ISBN: 0-691-01082-X, Princeton University Press, 1995.
Method of InstructionLecture with discussion.
Number and Types of Assignments There will be two in-class examinations and a final examination. There will also be two short papers written in response to primary or secondary source readings.
Examination Policies and Grading Information
1. Examinations will be graded according to the following scale: A+=99-100%; A=92-98%; A-=90-91%; B+=88-89%; B=82-87%; B-=80-81%; C+=78-79%; C=72-77%; C-=70-71%; D+=68-69%; D=62-67%; D-=60-61%; F=59% and below.
2. If over the course of the semester a student improves his/her grade average a full letter grade over the first exam score then the instructor may recognize such improvement through a somewhat higher final course grade.
3. When determining final grades the instructor may take class attendance into account if a student's average grade is very close to the borderline.
4. Examination Policy: Students are expected to take exams at the scheduled time. Make-up exams will be permitted only in cases of illness, injury, or at the discretion of the instructor. It is the student's responsibility to contact me, preferably before the exam, both to alert me and to schedule a make-up examination.

RELG 189H - UNIV HONORS SEMINAR:  JESUS THEN AND NOW 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
8843 3 001 0330p-0550p M AND 11 G. WATLEY
PREQ:   Good standing in the University Honors Program. 
Description of Material Being Covered To be announced.
Required Books
Burton H. Throckmorton, Gospel Parallels (NRSV), 5th Edition ISBN: 0-8407-7484-2, Nelson, 1992;
Mark Harding (Ed.), Early Christian Life and Thought in Social Context: A Reader, ISBN: 0-8264-5604-9, Continum, 2003;
Rodolphe Kasser, Marvin Meyer, Gregor Wurst (Eds.), The Gospel of Judas, ISBN: 1-4262-0042-0, National Geographis Soc., 2006;
Mark Allan Powell, Jesus as a Figure in History:  How Modern Historians View the Man from Galilee, ISBN: 0-664-25703-8, Westminster John Knox, 2003;
James M. Robinson (ed.), The Sayings of Jesus: The Sayings Gospel Q in English, ISBN: 0-8006-3451-9, Augsburg Frotress, 2001;
Michael D. Coogan, The New Oxford Annotated Apocrypha (NRSV), 3rd Edition, ISBN: 0-19-528800-9, Oxford UP, 2001.
Method of Instruction To be announced.
Number and Types of Assignments To be announced.
Examination Policies and Grading InformationTo be announced.

RELG 306 - 2ND TEMPLE JUDAISM 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
7781 3 001 0930a-1045a TR Henz 203 S. Crawford

Cross-Listed with Judaic Studies 306. 
Description of Material Being CoveredThis course will examine the history and throughout of the land of Israel and the Jewish people between the destruction of Solomon's Temple in 587BCE and the destruction of the Second Temple by the Roman Empire in 70CE. The course thus falls between Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament (Classics 205) and Early Christianity (Classics 307). We will read works from the Hebrew Bible, the Apocrypha, the Pseudepigrapha and the Dead Sea Scrolls.
Required Books
Geza Vermes, The Complete Dead Sea Scrolls in English, ISBN: 0-14-044952-3, Penguin, 2004;
George W. E. Nickelsburg, Jewish Literature Between the Bible and the Mishnah, ISBN: 0-8006-3779-8, Fortress Press, 2005;
Frederick J. Murphy, Early Judaism, ISBN: 1-56563-087-4, Hendrickson Pub., 2002;
Harper Collins Study Bible with Apocrypha, (New Revised Standard Version), ISBN: 0-06-065527-5, Harper San Francisco, 1997.
Method of InstructionLectures and discussion.
Number and Types of Assignments Reading of assigned works, class attendance and participation.
Examination Policies and Grading InformationThree in-class exams and a short paper.

RELG 318 - ISLAM IN THE MODERN WORLD
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
8006 3 001 1130a-1220p MWF CBA 140 S. Wood
Description of Material Being Covered This course examines the diversity of Islam in the modern world. It explores a variety of Muslim responses to modernity including traditionalism, secularism, Islamic modernism, and Islamic fundamentalism.
Required Books
Natana J. DeLong-Bas, Wahhabi Islam:  From Revival and Reform to Global Jihad, ISBN: 0-19-516991-3, Oxford UP, 2004, Required;
John L. Esposito, Islam:  The Straight Path, 3rd Edition, ISBN: 0-19-518266-9, Oxford, 2004, Required;
Ali Rahnema (Ed.), Pioneers of Islamic Revival, 2nd Edition. ISBN: 1-84277-615-0, Zed Books, 2006; Required;
Francois Burgat, Face to Face with Political Islam, ISBN: 1-86064-213-6, IB Tauris, 2003, Required;
Gregory Starrett, Putting Islam to Work:  Education, Politics, and Religious Transformation in Egypt, ISBN: 0-520-20927-3, Univ of Calif, 1998, Required;
Recommended:   Hamid Enayat, Modern Islamic Political Thought, ISBN: 1-85043-466-2, IB Tauris, 2005.
Method of Instruction To be announced.
Number and Types of Assignments To be announced.
Examination Policies and Grading Information To be announced.

RELG 398 - SPECIAL TOPICS: ARABIC 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
7784 3 001 0230p-0320p MWF AVH 108 S. Wood
Description of Material Being Covered This course will lay the foundation of modern standard Arabic; the grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and structure of the language.
Required Books
Kristen Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal, Abbas Al-Tonsi, Alif Baa: Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds, Package Edition, ISBN: 1-589-01102-3, Georgetown UP, 2001;
Kristen Brustad, Mahmoud Al-Batal, Abbas Al-Tonsi, Al-Kitaab fii Ta'allum al-'Arabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part One, ISBN: 1-589-01104-X. Georgetown UP, 1995.
Method of Instruction Presentation and explanation of vocabulary, grammar, syntax and structure; in-class and homework exercises. Students will have the opportunity to contribute to class sessions.
Number and Types of Assignments To be announced.
Examination Policies and Grading InformationTo be announced.

RELG 399 - INDEPENDENT STUDY 
Call# Cr Hrs Sec Time Days Bldg/Room Instructor
**** 1-6 001 Arranged Arranged Arranged Staff
PREQ:   Permission of Instructor. Obtain call # from the Classics office (472-2460). 

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