Overview

Conscious of our important role in a 21st-century Humanities discipline, the Department of English at UNL embraces the great responsibility of ensuring that the human includes all of its "voices," including those of ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. Our devotion to providing an intellectual climate of respect for, even affirmation of, difference is embodied in a faculty and curriculum that fosters these values on a daily basis. One of our faculty's great strengths, indeed, is the wide-ranging diversity of our teaching and scholarly talents and interests: we take pride in our course offerings in Women's literature and rhetoric, Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender literature, African and African-American literature, Latina/Latino literature, Native American literature, and Cultural Studies in general. In close coordination with the Institute for Ethnic Studies and the Women's and Gender Studies Program, the Department of English will continue on the forefront in acknowledging the human in all of its complexity, in our ongoing commitment to diversity.

(Selected) Faculty: A Diversity of Teaching & Research Interests

  • Stephen C. Behrendt–British Romantic women writers
  • Susan Belasco–19th-century women writers
  • Kwakiutl L. Dreher–African American literature: including contemporary literature, autobiography, and mass marketed popular literature; Film and Visual Culture
  • Gwendolyn A. Foster–Women filmmakers; gender theory; postcolonial film; whiteness studies/ethnicity theory
  • Tom Gannon–Native American literature: including Plains Indian literatures and Native eco/animal rights
  • Amy M. Goodburn–Multicultural pedagogies
  • Melissa J. Homestead–19th- and 20th-century women writers
  • Maureen Honey–Multi-cultural 20th-century women writers: Harlem Renaissance; Women's & Ethnic Studies
  • Frances W. Kaye–Native American literature, including Great Plains literature; Canadian literature
  • Amelia María de la Luz Montes–Chicana/Chicano and U.S. Latina/Latino literature and theory
  • Gregory E. Rutledge–African American literature and culture: including speculative fiction, literary history, the African-American epic aesthetic, folklore
  • Julia Schleck–Renaissance Travel Narratives to the Midldle East, Africa, and the AmeriArts & Sciences, with a focus on Anglo-Islamic relations

(Selected) Course Offerings

  • ENGL 101A: Writing from Literature: African American Literature
  • ENGL 101B: Writing from Literature: Chicano Literature
  • ENGL 101D: Writing from Literature: Native American Literature
  • ENGL 102A: Composition and Literature: African American Literature
  • ENGL 102B: Composition and Literature: Chicano Literature
  • ENGL 102D: Composition and Literature: Native American Literature
  • ENGL 212: Lesbian & Gay Literature
  • ENGL 215E: Introduction to Women's Literature
  • ENGL 215J: 20th Century Women Writers
  • ENGL 231A: English Authors After 1800: The Brontës and Their World
  • ENGL 239: Film Directors: Gay and Lesbian Directors
  • ENGL 239B: Women Filmmakers
  • ENGL 244: African American Literature
  • ENGL 244A: Introduction to African Literature
  • ENGL 244B: Black Women Authors
  • ENGL 244D: African-Caribbean Literature
  • ENGL 244E: Early African American Literature
  • ENGL 245B: Native American Literature
  • ENGL 245D: Chicana and/or Chicano Literature
  • ENGL 245J: Jewish-American Fiction
  • ENGL 245K: Canadian Literature
  • ENGL 245N: Native American Women Writers
  • ENGL 253A: Writing of Poetry: Women's Poetry
  • ENGL 282: Literature and Other Arts: Blacks in Film
  • ENGL 285: Introduction to Comparative Literature
  • ENGL 311D: Literature of Socialism
  • ENGL 315A: Survey of Women's Literature
  • ENGL 315B: Women in Pop Culture
  • ENGL 333A: American Authors Since 1900: Willa Cather and Her World
  • ENGL 342A: Irish Literature
  • ENGL 349: National Cinemas
  • ENGL 361A: Introduction to Early American Literature (all sections include a variety of minority writers)
  • ENGL 361B: Introduction to Late American Literature (all sections include a variety of minority writers)
  • ENGL 401K/801K: Gay and Lesbian Drama
  • ENGL 405K/805K: Canadian Fiction
  • ENGL 414/814: Women's Literature
  • ENGL 414B/814B: 20th Century Women Writers
  • ENGL 414D/814D: Feminist Theory & Criticism
  • ENGL 445/845: Ethnic Literature (incl. Latina/o Literature)
  • ENGL 445B/845B: African-American Literature
  • ENGL 445E/845E: Native American Literature
  • ENGL 445K/845K: African, African American Literature
  • ENGL 462A/862A: Ideas of Ethnicity in Medieval Literature
  • ENGL 471A/871A: African American Literary Criticism
  • ENGL 475A/875A: Rhetorical Theory: Rhetoric of Women Writers
  • ENGL 914: Seminar in Women Writers
  • ENGL 940: Seminar in African-American Literature
  • ENGL 940A: African Literature in English
  • ENGL 945: Seminar in Ethnic Literature
  • . . . And don't forget our PRAIRIE SCHOONER—one of the nation's leading literary quarterlies, with a serious commitment to diversity in its book prize screenings and staff readings of submissions

Academic Programs & Services