The Department of English considers what has made texts and their contexts worth knowing. We provide for the diverse needs of our students by offering them the opportunity to read widely, to understand and enjoy what they read, and to express themselves both orally and in writing with ease, force, and clarity. Courses are regularly offered in drama, poetry, and fiction; the English language; periods and authors in British and American literature; world literature in English; women’s literature and minority literatures; creative and expository writing; literary and rhetorical theory and criticism; and film.

The English department also houses the Film Studies program, which is centered on a core curriculum of four courses in the history of film, film genre, film directors, as well as film theory and criticism. To these core courses are added related courses, particularly those that integrate the study of moving image culture with rhetoric, philosophy, literary criticism, ethnic literature and visual cultures of all types. The program is designed for students who wish to ultimately work in academic film studies, and also for students who wish to understand film better as an art form, as popular culture, and as a major medium of communication.

A student declaring an English or Film Studies major should meet with the chief adviser at least once a year to update the major plan, to review progress toward the degree, to plan a concentration, and to consult about course selection, scholarships, and careers or post-graduate education.

To view the current requirements for graduating with majors or minors in the English department, use the links below to the visit the Undergraduate Bulletin major pages:

Students are assigned a bulletin year when they enter and enroll at the university. To review the Bulletin Rule Policy, or to view previous bulletins, go to the Bulletin Rules page.

The undergraduate major in English is designed for three groups: 1) general education; 2) teachers in the elementary and secondary schools; and 3) those pursuing graduate study in the field. The major is also frequently chosen as preparation for professional study in law, medicine, and business, and for careers in other fields. Courses are regularly offered in drama, poetry, and fiction; the English language; periods and authors in British and American literature; world literature in English; women’s literature and minority literatures; creative and expository writing; literary and rhetorical theory and criticism; and film.

The English department also houses the film studies program, which is centered on a core curriculum of four courses in the history of film, film genre, film directors, as well as film theory and criticism. To these core courses are added related courses, particularly those that integrate the study of moving image culture with rhetoric, philosophy, literary criticism, ethnic literature and visual cultures of all types. The program is designed for students who wish to ultimately work in academic film studies, and also for students who wish to understand film better as an art form, as popular culture, and as a major medium of communication.

A student declaring an English or Film Studies major should meet with the chief advisor at least once a year to update the major plan, to review progress toward the degree, to plan a concentration, and to consult about course selection, scholarships, and careers or post-graduate education.

To view the current requirements for graduating with majors or minors in the English department, use the links below to the visit the Undergraduate Bulletin major pages:

Students are assigned a bulletin year when they enter and enroll at the university. To review the Bulletin Rule Policy, or to view previous bulletins, go to the Bulletin Rules page.

Students will design their own concentration in consultation with the chief adviser and appropriate faculty. Such concentrations should combine courses from various areas of the department into a coherent program of study based on the student's own areas of interest. In some cases, an interdisciplinary concentration may include a course from another department. Students select four courses above the 299 level. There is a limit of 6 hours in creative writing courses. Students are encouraged to create a focused strand of interest organized around a controlling theme or topic consulting with the English Undergraduate Advising Office (201 Andrews) early in their program.

Where can I get help figuring out my major?

At the English Undergraduate Advising Center in room 201 Andrews Hall. You can also call 472-3870 or visit: http://www.unl.edu/english/ugrad/current.html#advise

Where can I get help with writing?

The Writing Assistance Center (http://www.unl.edu/writing) assists any UNL student engaged in a writing project by providing hands-on techniques that enable the student writer to say what he or she means.

Will I have opportunities for creative writing and publication?

Laurus is the undergraduate literary magazine published each year through the English Department. Student editors select materials submitted by student writers and supervise the details of publication. Plains Song Review is the undergraduate magazine published by the Center for Great Plains Studies for the College of Arts and Sciences. Prairie Schooner, one of the oldest and most distinguished literary magazines in the world, is edited and published by the English Department and offers editorial reader positions for undergraduate creative writers of exceptional talent. Each spring the English department sponsors a number of literary contests -- with Arts & Sciences prizes! -- open to all English majors.

Are there any English clubs or honoraries?

Literary League is the Recognized Student Organization for the English Department. There are no membership fees or dues. Open to all majors and minors. Additional information can be found at http://www.unl.edu/english/ugrad/lit_league.html.

What is the English Department like?

English is one of the original divisions of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and has been offering classes continuously since 1869. Virtually every UNL student takes at least one class in the English Department. There are approximately 450 English majors in the College of Arts and Sciences. Teaching staff includes more than 100 graduate student or part-time instructors and approximately 50 full-time professors, all of whom hold PhDs or equivalent credentials and publish books and internationally-recognized journal articles each year.

Can I use Independent Studies and Internships in my major?

Students may create their own classes to read extensively in a particular English field, to do extended research, to undertake a sustained creative project, or to explore experiential education relevant to English studies. All one needs is a good idea and a faculty sponsor.

Do I have the option of writing an Undergraduate Thesis?

English majors in the Honors program are required to write a thesis, while students who have compiled a GPA higher than 3.5 have this option. The thesis gives students opportunities to develop sustained research or creative projects that cap off their undergraduate careers.

Can I get paid for doing research?

UCARE (Undergraduate Creative Activities and Research Experience program) pays undergraduates to work alongside faculty members and participate directly in campus research and creative activities. Many English majors have used UCARE research for their senior theses.

What kind of career can I pursue with an English degree?

After graduation, English majors regularly enter graduate or professional schools or begin careers in writing, editing, journalism, political action, government, or the entertainment industry.

What is the difference between the minor and the concentration?

The English major (like some other majors in the College of Arts &  Sciences) requires that students complete an approved minor or a second major. Students may select their minor or second major from the list of university-approved programs in the undergraduate bulletin. The minor is indicated on a student’s transcript and the degree audit under its official title.

English majors are also required to complete a concentration or twelve credit hours (4 courses) at the 300 and/or 400 level with a maximum of 6 hours in creative writing. The twelve credit hours that students designate for the concentration may not apply in other areas in the English major. Students may select their concentration using our department concentration guidelines (available online under our “Current Student” tab) or in consultation with our department chief major advisor. While students may track their concentration using the Degree Audit (DARS) resource, the concentration is not indicated on the final transcript nor is it a “university-recognized” program. Rather, the concentration is a department requirement.

Department of English Undergraduate Advising Center

The English Advising Center exists to help you succeed in your undergraduate career at UNL. English and/or Film Studies majors should schedule an appointment with an advisor to review their Degree Audit and to plan their classes each semester. Students may schedule an appointment to discuss any aspect of university life, including major or minor planning, career and research opportunities, internships, and graduate school preparation.

Advisor

Kelly Payne, Advisor and Lecturer
Email: kpayne2@unl.edu

Kelly PayneWelcome to the English Department at the University of Nebraska. As the department’s undergraduate advisor, I assist students with all aspects of planning for graduation from making appropriate course selections to gaining relevant career experience through volunteering and internships. My priority is to help you and other English and Film Studies majors to achieve your educational goals.

The bachelor’s degree in English is a significant credential in demonstrating your ability to think critically, communicate effectively, and value the customs and literature of diverse cultures. From words to worlds, the English undergraduate program is your passport to success!


Hours Fall 2013

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday 8:00-4:00 p.m. by appointment (students should use MyPlan in Blackboard or call the office directly to schedule meeting times)
Tuesday 1:00-3:00 p.m. walk-in hours (no appointment necessary)

Current students may schedule an appointment using MyPlan, https://my.unl.edu. Prospective, transfer, or returning students should call 402-472-3870 to schedule an appointment.

Location

201 Andrews Hall

Advising Resources & Forms

Visit the following page to view and download forms related to the advising process: http://www.unl.edu/english/ugrad/current.html#forms

Department of English Undergraduate Advising Center

Forms

The advising office is now using fillable PDF forms that can be submitted by e-mail. To use these forms, please download the form to your computer and use Adobe Reader (free) to open them.

Paper copies of the following forms can be obtained in the Advising Center located in Andrews Hall room 201. If you have questions regarding the forms, email Kelly Payne at kpayne2@unl.edu.

Need help sending emails from Adobe Reader? If you don't have a mail application installed on your computer, you can send PDF forms from your UNL email account (@unl.edu or @huskers.unl.edu) by following these instructions. You'll need to configure some settings the first time you submit a form, but the process will be one step after the initial setup.

Complete Listing of Forms

Graduate and Professional School Resources

College of Arts & Sciences Advising Center

Email: asadvisingcenter2@unl.edu
Phone: 472-4190


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