Best Practices for Collaborating on Research

Across the disciplines, collaboration and interdisciplinary work is growing. As teamwork in scholarship increases, it’s important to establish good practices for collaboration. Laying clear ground rules (Howard Gadlin and Kevin Jessar call these a “prenuptial agreement for scientists”) and having an open discussion about expectations helps the collaboration run smoothly. This is equally true if you are collaborating with different labs at other universities, working with private industry, or keeping your mentor up to date on your own research.

Graduate Students as Stewards of the Discipline

When you think of a steward, you might imagine someone in a manor who ensures the household runs smoothly, the tenants are cared for, and the buildings are kept in good repair with an eye toward preserving the enterprise for generations to come. In short, a manager.

Attributing Words and Ideas in Your Work

As a graduate student, you engage with diverse ideas and academic work. Writing papers for your seminars and later your thesis and dissertation require you to account for other voices while establishing your own academic voice. Properly citing sources as you write provides a foundation for your argument and builds your credibility as a scholar. You can make connections between your work and previous work through three techniques: summary, paraphrase, and quotation.

Academic Integrity: A Letter to My Students

Bill Taylor, professor emeritus of political science at Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, Ill., is deeply convinced that academic integrity on the part of both faculty and students is an essential part of any true educational experience. He begins each semester with an open letter to his students, explaining his views on academic integrity, offering his promise to students to exercise integrity in his dealings with them, and outlining his expectations of students in the same regard.

Academic Integrity

Among the most basic academic values are the honest creation of new knowledge, the discovery of new facts, new ways of looking at the known world, and the original analysis of old ideas. The simple repetition of the words and thoughts of someone else does not lead to the level of understanding an educated person is expected to have (Standler, 2000). Those who embrace the intent of the educational experience earn not only the satisfaction of generating new knowledge, but the respect and esteem of their professors, colleagues, and professional peers.

The Institutional Review Board and You: An Interview with UNL's Research Compliance Staff

The safety and well being of human research participants is taken very seriously at UNL. The Institutional Review Board, which is overseen by UNL’s Office of Research, handles approval of human research. From providing a Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) course to maintaining knowledge of all federal, state and local regulations related to research, the IRB provides necessary support to UNL’s research community.

Key Practices for Integrity In Research

Integrity in research and creative activity is based not only on sound disciplinary practice but also on a commitment to basic personal values such as fairness, equity, honesty and respect. The following guidelines are intended to promote high professional standards by everyone— faculty, staff and students alike.

How to be Fair and Ethical in the Classroom

Many aspects of the teaching assistant's rolemay create ethical dilemmas of one sort or another. Your roles as adviser, evaluator, exam administrator, authority figure and peer have the potential to become problematic at times, often because they present conflicting demands. Because fairness is a perception based on interpretations of behavior, not intentions, many instructors may inadvertently engage in what students perceive to be unfair behavior.

How to be Fair and Ethical in the Classroom

Many aspects of the teaching assistant's role may create ethical dilemmas of one sort or another. Your roles as adviser, evaluator, exam administrator, authority figure and peer have the potential to become problematic at times, often because they present conflicting demands. Because fairness is a perception based on interpretations of behavior, not intentions, many instructors may inadvertently engage in what students perceive to be unfair behavior.

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