NCMN  Members  Celebrate  Research  Breakthroughs  in  Materials  and  Nanoscience !
....at the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience

NCMN Faculty - Tabs to Labs, Groups & Pages

Lab web pages feature current research & special projects, facilities & equipment, group members, publications & books, news, teaching, schedules, links.
See also: Engineering Research Labs

S. Adenwalla

Gu Tissue Mechanics Lab

Research Expertise and Interests - Dr. Shireen Adenwalla's work involves structural characterization of materials, magnetic systems, polymers and the development of solid state neutron detectors.

 

R. Kirby

 

Roger D. Kirby research is directed towards the understanding of magnetism in nanoscale and nanostructured materials, including thin films, multilayer films, and laterally patterned films. His group has fabricated one- and two-dimensional arrays of laterally structured magnetic systems by direct interference laser annealing, which is a very versatile method of varying materials properties without modifying surface topography. This technique can be used to form nanoscale arrays of dots and/or antidots in thin magnetic films. This has led to the observation of a magnetic anisotropy lattice, in which magnetic dots of in-plane magnetic anisotropy are formed in a background of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. His group has developed several optical systems for studying magneto-optical properties of thin film and bulk samples over a wide range of wavelengths and temperatures. Most recently, his group has developed a “pump-probe” magneto-optical system based on a femtosecond laser, which permits the observation of magnetization precession and damping in thin films in a variety of experimental configurations. This system can provide a detailed understanding of magnetic coupling between nanoelements in thin films, multilayers and laterally structured materials.

Y. Zhou

Lu's LANE Group

Laser Assisted Nano Engineering group (LANE) at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln was established in fall of 2002. Our group carries out state of art research in the field of nanotechnology using lasers. We aim to develop novel techniques using lasers for various applications including surface cleaning, nanoimprinting, nano-manufacturing, building photonic devices, nano-Raman and Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy.

C. Barnes

 

Caren M. Barnes, R.D.H., M.S. at UNMC College of Dentistry, Coordinator of Clinical Research, Department of Dental Hygiene

E. Baesu

 

Eveline Baesu research is in the general area of solid mechanics. There are three main areas of interest: (i) electromechanical effects, (ii) fiber networks, and (iii) biomechanics.

Electromechanical effects: Her research in the electrodynamics of continuous media has been in modeling coupled nonlinear electromechanical effects in solids, especially piezoelectric materials, with an emphasis on studying the effect of initial electric and mechanical fields on the subsequent behavior of these materials. Her work in this area has led to substantial contributions to the understanding of failure and material stability in electroactive materials in general and piezoelectrics in particular. Current research interests in this area include multiscale modeling of piezoelectricity.

Fiber networks: Another area of research that Professor Baesu is actively pursuing is the modeling of continua of filamentary networks. She developed a model for continua composed of a network of elastic-plastic fibers, which allows the overall response of the continuum to be inferred the properties of each fiber family and, vice-versa, under certain restrictions on the number of fiber families. This last feature may be particularly useful in experimental characterization of certain composites consisting of nano-fibers for which the properties of the nano-fibers cannot be directly measured. Currently this paradigm is extended to a network of piezoelectric fibers, which are again important for smart structure applications. Further, she is exploring applications of this theory to the design of tissue scaffolds for biomedical applications.

Biomechanics (cellular mechanics): Another area of Professor Baesu’s research is the mechanics of the mechanics of living cells. In a unique collaborative effort with biologists and material scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, she has helped develop a multi-pronged program of research involving experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects, which is centered by using the unique capabilities of the atomic force microscope (AFM). The focus of her work has been the development of a non-linear model of cell membrane, as well as modeling the contact between the AFM tip and the cell membrane. The aim is to exploit these capabilities and develop a tool for non-destructive monitoring of changes in living cells with applications to, e.g. early diagnosis of cancer, multiple sclerosis etc., pathogen invasion.

B. Cheung

Barry Chin Li Cheung

Laboratory of Advanced Nanomaterials and Devices- Our research focuses on three important areas of nanoscale chemistry:

  • The design and synthesis of novel nanomaterials by abstracting the efficient designs from nature
  • The study of biological macromolecules at the nanoscale using methods of nanotechnology
  • The development of new analytical devices via biomimetical approach with nanomaterials

Our research commitments are to advance the fundamental understanding of the self-assembly processes in nature and to exploit these processes to design and synthesize hierarchical nanostructures with novel physical and chemical properties. Our highly interdisciplinary research is supported by the excellent facilities and collaborative environment of the University of Nebraska system.

W. Choe

 

The Choe group members have successfully demonstrated a series of crystalline 2D/3D metal-organic frameworks with fascinating topologies, built from porphyrins and paddlewheel clusters (see an example in the figure above). These solids are referred as porphyrin paddlewheel frameworks (PPFs). Interestingly, these PPFs have large void spaces with channel sizes up to ca. 2nm. The topologies of PPFs can be systematically controlled by the coordination chemistry of the metal centers inside porphyrins. Currently, the group is working on physical characterization of these PPFs, and the topological design of new ones. These porphyrin-based materials may provide important chemical understanding in areas such as gas storage, heterogeneous catalysis, and chemical sensors. A new collaborative activity includes 2D porphyrin surface structures with Drs. Enders (physics) and Zheng (Chemistry) at UNL. Utilizing hydrogen- or coordination-bond, self-assembled porphyrins form interesting 2D surface patterns, which can be used as a basis for building surface-supported 3D hybrid structures.

P. Dussault

 

Patrick H. Dussault -Current Research

1) Organic synthesis (natural products as well as functionalized materials)

2) New oxidation methods

3) Chemistry of peroxide explosives

4) Chemical biology

 

D. Covey

 

David A. Covey - Biomaterials Group

We have a research group that has a primary focus on the science of dental materials. The demand for esthetic dental materials has never been greater and research and development of more predictable and longer lasting dental materials is at an all-time high. The introduction of these new materials requires laboratory and clinical research on the safety, efficacy and various behavioral properties of these materials.

Examples of the types of research our team conducts on dental materials: Surface roughness, Gloss, Color, Mechanical properties, Bonding properties, Bonding properties, Surface Hardness, Interface MIcroleakage

Types of dental materials our research team evaluate: Dental amalgam, Composite resins, Glass ionomer cements, Implants, Ceramics

 

S. Darveau

UNK Solar Energy and Nanoscience Research Group SENRG

Scott Darveau - UNK Solar Energy and Nanoscience Research Group - SENRG

The UNK Solar Energy and Nanoscience Research Group (SENRG) is active in the development and study of nanocrystalline semiconductor and noble metal materials.  At UNK, our lab equipment and capabilities include a physical vapor deposition apparatus used for solid-state reactions and annealing, single-gun magnetron sputtering for substrate preparation, micro-Raman spectroscopy, ICP-OES for elemental analysis, infrared and UV-vis spectroscopy for bandgap measurements, and low-voltage electron microscopy for SEM and TEM imaging.

 

NCMN Faculty - Tabs to Labs, Groups & Pages

Lab web pages feature current research & special projects, facilities & equipment, group members, publications & books, news, teaching, schedules, links.

M. Schubert

Complex Materials Optics Network

Mathias Schubert

The Complex Materials Optics Network CMON comprises active research groups within the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The primary focus is optical materials preparation, characterization, and instrumentation development for solving contemporary experimental and theoretical problems in materials sciences and engineering bridging Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Engineering applications. The cluster currently is sectioned into Materials Preparation, Instrumentation, Optical Physics, Photonic Crystals, and Biomaterials groups. Instrumentation developments address Terahertz Ellipsometry, Generalized Ellipsometry, and field-dependent linear and nonlinear spatial- and time-resolving optical probes. Active research areas address magnetic, ferroelectric and multiferroic materials, and nanoscience, nanostructure preparation, charge transport in quantum regime systems, and biointerface properties, for example.

E. F-Schubert

Eva Franke-Schubert - Current Research

My research interests are in the field of ion beam processing and nanostructured thin film fabrication for optical, electromechanical, and magnetic device applications. The research is currently focused on synthesis of novel nanostructured chiral hybrid materials with the goal to develop concepts for technological exploitation of physical and chemical properties related to the unique material structure and morphology.

Y. Dzenis

 

Current research interests of Dr. Dzenis are in advanced functional nanomaterials and nanomanufacturing. Experimental studies are conducted in a comprehensive, state-of-the-art $1.6M laboratory on multifunctional nanomaterials, composites, nano- and micromechanics, and multiscale nondestructive evaluation (NDE).

D. Timm

Unit Operations Lab

Delmar Timm - Unit Operations Laboratory

Dr. Delmar Timm's research focuses on composite materials comprised of a polymeric matrix. Emphasis is directed at developing correlations between the resin's molecular structure and its physical performance. With thermosetting resins, polymeric molecules are characterized by their degree of polymerization, chemical composition, extent of chain branching, and degree of chain cross-linking. Theoretical modeling incorporates deterministic and stochastic methodologies.

G. Harbison

DiMagno Lab page

Gerard S. Harbison - Harbison Group

The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) frequencies of atoms such as 1H, 13C, 31P, and so on, are exquisitely sensitive to their environment. That environment includes electrons in closed shells, open shells and bonds, and other nuclei in constant motion, and also depends on the orientation of these objects relative to the large magnetic field we apply to the sample. We use the NMR frequency to probe the structure of materials.

C. Eckhardt

Craig J. Eckhardt - Eckhardt Group

Research in the Eckhardt group centers on organic materials and organic solid-state chemistry. Systems being investigated range over nanotribology, mechanochemistry, energetic materials (propellants and explosives), supramolecules and organic ferroelectrics. The program has both theoretical and experimental components and involves a wide variety of techniques: Brillouin and Raman scattering, UV-Vis emission, reflection and absorption spectroscopy from 4K to 300K, friction force microscopy, contact angle goniometry, very low temperature calorimetry, high pressure spectroscopy using diamond anvil cells and very low frequency FTIR spectroscopy, surface potential, viscosity and pressure measurements, and Brewster angle microscopy.

N. Ianno

Netalie J. Ianno - Research Interests

  • Thin Film Deposition including sputtering and PECVD
  • High Density Plasma Processing
  • Nanoscale processing
  • In-situ optical process monitroing

J. Woollam

J. A. Woollam Co., Inc.  PESL , J.A. Woollam, Inc.

John A. Woollam - We have focused our research in recent years on thin films. This involves film preparation, and characterization by numerous experimental techniques. These include atomic force microscopy, spectrophotometry, optical interference microscopy. Our specialty however is spectroscopic ellipsometry. We cover the spectral range with existing ellipsometers from 0.023eV to 6.6eV. Ellipsometers measure optical constants, thin film layer thickness, alloy concentrations, surface roughness, sample temperature, and can be used on multilayered condensed matter samples with nanometer scale dimensions.

 

C. Exstrom

UNK Solar Energy and Nanoscience Research Group (SENRG)

Christopher Exstrom - UNK Solar Energy and Nanoscience Research Group - SENRG

The UNK Solar Energy and Nanoscience Research Group (SENRG) is active in the development and study of nanocrystalline semiconductor and noble metal materials.  At UNK, our lab equipment and capabilities include a physical vapor deposition apparatus used for solid-state reactions and annealing, single-gun magnetron sputtering for substrate preparation, micro-Raman spectroscopy, ICP-OES for elemental analysis, infrared and UV-vis spectroscopy for bandgap measurements, and low-voltage electron microscopy for SEM and TEM imaging.

L. Fernandez-B

Lucia Fernandez-Ballester - Current Research

My research objective aims at understanding the relationship between molecular structure, processing conditions, morphology obtained and final properties in polymers. Particularly, a special emphasis is directed towards revealing the pathway and kinetics of structure formation in real-time.

Some specific areas of interest are:

  • Processing and flow-induced crystallization of polymers
  • Biopolymers
  • Self-assembly and nanostructures in polymers and supramolecules

A range of in-situ and ex-situ experimental techniques is needed to explore molecular characteristics, structure development, and final morphology. Some of the experimental techniques used are differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarized optical microscopy (POM), real-time optical birefringence, and synchrotron X-ray scattering (WAXD/SAXS).

 

Major NCMN-affiliated departments are listed below: