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Sunday with a Scientist

Sunday with a Scientist(December 2013) The University of Nebraska State Museum's next Sunday with a Scientist program for children and families will explore plant gene silencing. Bin Yu, assistant professor in the School of Biological Sciences, will introduce children and families to gene silencing triggered by RNAs and related technologies used to improve crop traits and fight against human disease. The program will take place on Sunday, December 15 from 1:30-4:30 p.m. at Morrill Hall.


Weeks named Fellow to National Academy of Inventors

Dr. Donald Weeks (December 2013) Donald Weeks has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, an honor given to esteemed innovators and inventors. Weeks, the Maxcy Professor of Agriculture and Natural Resources, was recognized for distinguished contributions in plant and algal biotechnology and efforts to translate research discoveries into solutions that benefit society.

Read more at Today@UNL.

Holding earns research awards
Dr. David Holding

(November 2013) Assistant professor David Holding received a Junior Faculty for Excellence in Research Award. The awards are provided through the Branham Endowment Fund. Given annually by the Agricultural Research Division, the award is for tenure-track assistant professors with an ARD appointment with five or less years of professional service at UNL. The award is based upon publication record, evidence of external funding activity and peer recognition.

Holding is an assistant professor with the Center for Plant Science Innovation and Agronomy and Horticulture. He has published research papers in journals including Nature Communications, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Plant Cell and Plant Physiology and recently received extramural funding from USDA-NIFA and ConAgra. His research program aims to identify and functionally characterize genes involved in kernel maturation in corn and sorghum. He is particularly interested in understanding and exploiting the complex relationship between kernel texture and protein quality.

Mackenzie named 2013 ASPB Fellow

Dr. Sally Mackenzie

(April 2013) Dr. Sally Mackenzie has been named a 2013 Fellow of the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB). The Fellow of ASPB award was established in 2007 to recognize distinguished and long-term contributions to plant biology and service to the Society by current members in areas including research, education, and professional and public service. Dr. Mackenzie has served on numerous ASPB committees including the Executive Committee (2007 to present), the Public Affairs Committee (2009-present), and the Publications Committee, which she has chaired since 2006 and also on the editorial board of Plant Physiology.

Special Recognition
Special recognition to Dr. Ray Chollet, Professor Emeritus, who was also named a 2013 Fellow of the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) and to Dr. Brian Larkins, Associate Vice Chancellor for Life Sciences, who is the recipient of the 2013 Stephen Hales Prize.

NSF award aids Basset's coenzyme Q research

Dr. Gilles Basset(December 2012) Nearly all organisms — from animals and plants to many bacteria — require the micronutrient ubiquinone, or coenzyme Q, for survival. Humans produce it in their bodies and consume it in their diets. But scientists don’t understand how cells produce this vital compound.

Gilles Basset, an assistant professor of agronomy and horticulture, is using a new approach to study this elusive nutrient. His research may lead to improving human health. A faculty member in UNL’s Center for Plant Science Innovation, Basset studies how plants synthesize and metabolize chemicals beneficial to health.

He’s expanding his ubiquinone research with a five-year, $784,820 Faculty Early Career Development Program, or CAREER Award, from the National Science Foundation. This prestigious award helps outstanding pre-tenure faculty develop as teacher-scholars and researchers.

“We know that they are very important, but we don’t understand how living organisms make these compounds,” Basset said of ubiquinones. “Understanding how they are made will allow us to, for instance, improve plant-based food.”

Read more about Dr. Basset's ubiquinone research at Today@UNL.
Alfano named AAAS fellow

Dr. James Alfano

Three UNL professors have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science — the world's largest general scientific society. The tradition of naming AAAS Fellows goes back to 1874. It is a peer-designated selection based on scientifically or socially distinguished efforts among scientists to advance science or its application.

This is the first time three UNL scientists achieved the AAAS Fellow in the same year.

UNL's new AAAS Fellows are L. Dennis Smith, for distinguished contributions to developmental biology and leadership and advocacy on education; James Alfano, for distinguished contributions in research of plant pathogens; and Mike Nastasi, for contributions in energy, manufacturing, nanotechnology and microelectronics.

This year, 702 members are awarded this honor by AAAS, and will be presented with a certificate and a gold and blue (representing science and engineering, respectively) rosette pin on Feb. 16 during the 2013 AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston.

Alfano, Charles Bessey Professor in the Department of Plant Pathology, has been at UNL since 2000. He said he was flattered when he learned he had been named to the esteemed list after being nominated by UNL plant pathology professor James Van Etten, who also is an AAAS Fellow and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

"It feels great, and it's nice to be recognized by such a prestigious organization," Alfano said. "It was an honor just being nominated, a recognition of our hard work, and we're going to continue to work hard."

Alfano researches how bacterial pathogens cause disease in plants and how their strategies differ from the strategies employed by the bacterial pathogens of animals.

His seven-member lab, which is associated with the Department of Plant Pathology and the Center for Plant Science Innovation at UNL, focuses on the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and its interaction with plants. The pathogen's key feature is a bacterial protein secretion system that injects bacterial proteins into plant cells, which allows it to grow in plants and eventually cause disease. Alfano's research delves into plant cells to determine precisely how the bacterial proteins modify them to favor disease.

"We’re working to understand how and what (P. syringae) is targeting inside plant cells," he said. "Our ultimate goal is to identify new components of plant immunity. We've learned a lot about this plant-pathogen interaction — now we want to transform that knowledge into improvements in agriculture."

Assistant Professor Jeffrey Mower named recipient of the Branham Endowment Junior Faculty for Excellence in Research Award

 Dr. Jeffrey MowerJeffrey Mower, with the Center for Plant Science Innovation (PSI) and Agronomy and Horticulture Department has been named as recipient of the Junior Faculty for Excellence in Research Award provided by the Branham Endowment Fund for 2012-2013.  The Award is given annually by the Agricultural Research Division to up to two tenure-track Assistant Professors with an ARD appointment who has five or less years of professional service at UNL and is based upon publication record, evidence of external funding activity and peer recognition. 

Jeff Mower received a BS in molecular biology from the University of Texas at Austin in 1999. He worked for a year in the Human Genetics Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston before moving on to graduate school at Indiana University Bloomington, where he received a MS in bioinformatics in 2004 and a PhD in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology in 2005. After graduation, he spent two years as a postdoc at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. He is currently an assistant professor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in the Center for Plant Science Innovation and Department of Agronomy and Horticulture. He has published 17 research papers in journals including Nature and Science and two book chapters.  His research aims to address fundamental questions on the evolution of genome structure, function and content in plants using a combination of experimental and computational approaches which has applications to understanding disease resistance in crop plants and developing algae for biofuels. Mower takes an active role within his department, university-wide affiliations, teaching and mentoring, professional outreach activities and the Lincoln community.  His nominators stated that he is a highly valued colleague who has demonstrated great potential for making major advances in genomics research as well as innovations in the classroom.

UNL Scientists Find Plants 'Remember' Drought, Change Responses to Survive

Plants subjected to a previous period of drought learn to deal with the stress thanks to their memories of the previous experience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln research has found. The findings could lead to development of crops better able to withstand drought. The research also confirms, for the first time, the scientific basis for what home gardeners and nursery professionals have learned, often through hard experience: Transplants do better when water is withheld for a few days to drought harden them before the move.

"This phenomenon of drought hardening is in the common literature but not really in the academic literature," said Michael Fromm, a UNL plant scientist who was part of the research team. "The mechanisms involved in this process seem to be what we found." The work is the subject of an article this week in the online journal Nature Communications.

2012 Plant Science Retreat

The Plant Science Retreat is a biennial event for members of the University of Nebraska (UNL) Plant Science Community. The forum provides a platform to hear and discuss the latest in Plant Science research activities both within and outside the State. The 2012 Retreat was held at Arbor Lodge in Nebraska City on October 19 & 20. The keynote speaker was Dr. Patrick Schnable, Director of the Center for Plant Genomics, Iowa State University, along with special guest Dr. Brian Larkins, Associate Vice Chancellor for the Life Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. A Poster session took place following dinner on Friday evening in the Steinhardt Lodge. Talks continued Saturday morning, October 20, followed by closing remarks.

The Plant Science Retreat is sponsored by the Center for Plant Science Innovation, with funding from UNL departments and additional sources. There are no meal or double occupancy costs to participants. Fees will be charged if single room occupancy is requested. 

Retreat Flyer

ASPB Midwest Section Meeting 2012

ASPB Midwest Section Meeting 2012The University of Nebraska-Lincoln hosted the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) Midwest Section meeting on March 24-25, 2012. The American Society of Plant Biologists was founded in 1924 to promote the growth and development of plant biology, to encourage and publish research in plant biology, and to promote the interests and growth of plant scientists in general. Membership spans six continents, and members work in such diverse areas as academia, government laboratories, and industrial and commercial environments. The Society also has a large student membership. ASPB plays a key role in uniting the international plant science disciplines. For more information about the Midwest Section of ASPB visit http://my.aspb.org/group/midwestern.

New Plant and Soil Sciences eLibrary Offers Worldwide Collaboration

An expanded Plant and Soil Sciences eLibrary website will give students, adult learners, teachers and industry a place to learn interactively and globally. The new site at passel.unl.edu offers more collaborative tools and uses social media to accompany its animations, lessons and wealth of information and course materials, said Deana Namuth-Covert, plant science educator and eLibrary director. Namuth-Covert said the new site will give its current users a place to work together and share ideas. In addition, the site has a new look and new tools to continue drawing in users from across the state, country and world. The Plant and Soil Sciences eLibrary is on Facebook and Twitter @eLibrarypro.

Nebraska Has Key Role in Addressing Global Food Needs

Nebraska is at the epicenter of the challenge of increasing food production to meet the needs of a world population expected to reach more than 9 billion people by 2050, said Ronnie Green, the vice chancellor of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

Ronnie Green was the keynote speaker at the Heartland Transatlantic Conference on Food and Fuels Monday morning at the State Capitol. Diplomatic officials from countries including France, Germany, Austria, the Czech Republic, the Slovak Republic and Estonia have joined Nebraska representatives at the conference, which focuses on the vital role Nebraska agribusiness and research plays in meeting the global demands for food and fuels.

Coyne Lectureship features Plant Breeding and Genetics Discussion

"Genomics in the Age of Plant Breeding" was presented by Phillip E. McClean as part of the Dermot P. Coyne Graduate Student Distinguished Lectureship Series on April 4. McClean works on dry bean genetics and biotechnology and is the director of the Genomics and Bioinformatics Program at North Dakota State University in Fargo.

His visit was courtesy of the Coyne Lectureship Series which was established by Dermot P. Coyne in the area of plant breeding and genetics. Coyne, a George Holmes Professor of Agronomy and Horticulture in the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources, developed new varieties of dry edible beans and squash while a plant breeder at UNL for more than 40 years. He released many popular dry bean varieties in support of the Nebraska and High Plains bean industry. Coyne, who died in 2002, also developed several varieties of pinto, pompadour and great northern beans that were resistant to bean common mosaic virus, rust, common bacterial blight and other bacterial diseases. His disease-resistant germplasm releases and varieties are parents of numerous bean varieties grown in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe.

BGSA Annual Symposium

The Biological Graduate Student Association encouraged all students to present their research to the Biological Sciences community. It is a great opportunity to highlight their research and hard work. The abstract deadline was been extended to March 29.

2012 UNL Research Fair

A celebration highlighting graduate student research and creative activity will be held on April 4, 2012, at the Nebraska Union as part of the campus-wide 2012 UNL Spring Research Fair. The purpose of the Graduate Student Poster Session is to give students the opportunity to showcase their research or creative activity; to communicate their results to other students, faculty and staff; and to learn about other areas of research and creative activity.  Deadline for registration: Friday, March 16. For more information please visit: 2012 Graduate Research Fair.

2012 Plant Breeding & Genetics Symposium

University of Nebraska-Lincoln graduate students are organizing a Plant Breeding and Genetics Symposium on April 3 in the UNL East Campus Union. The symposium includes the following speakers: Dr. Stephen Baenziger (UNL Agronomy and Horticulture), Dr. David Habier (Pioneer Hi-Bred), Dr. Jean-Luc Jannink (USDA-ARS at Cornell), Dr. Jode Edwards (USDA-ARS at Iowa St), Michael Gore (USDA-ARS in Arizona), and a welcome address from Dr. Joe Keaschall (Pioneer Hi-Bred).

The symposium is free to attend and is open to everyone, but seating is limited so registration is required by March 26. The symposium is also offered online via a free webinar so we are encouraging people to watch the event distantly. Registration is recommended for those watching online so that we can send an email reminder and instructions for connecting to the symposium at a later date.  For additional details and registration visit: http://go.unl.edu/pbsymposium.

14th Annual Women in Science Conference

Women in Science participants On Saturday, Feb. 18, the Center for Plant Science Innovation welcomed high school students participating in the 2012 Women in Science Conference at theASPB 2012 University of Nebraska-Lincoln. This valuable and rewarding conference, now in its 14th year, encourages high school women to pursue their interests in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. The students are given multiple opportunities to meet professional women and current University of Nebraska-Lincoln science majors. Tours of the UNL campuses, including a behind-the-scenes look at researchers' laboratories in the George W. Beadle Center, are highlights of the conference.

For more information, visit http://go.unl.edu/wis. View news release.

Brand: 'Wild and Woolly' Times for Genetic Engineering

The world is entering a "wild and woolly" time of genetic engineering of food, when some of the most significant advancements may come from "amateur biotech" practitioners and in the developing world, says Stewart Brand, a self-described ecopragmatist and founder of the "Whole Earth Catalog."

Brand spoke at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Tuesday night as part of the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources Heuermann Lecture series. Brand, who acknowledges he's "having great fun being a heretic" among environmentalists, said genetic engineering is critical to feeding an expanding world population. He describes those who oppose genetic engineering as "superstitious, anti-science and, by the way, very harmful."

As an example, he cited golden rice, a new genetically modified rice that contains beta carotene, a source of Vitamin A critical to children's nourishment. Planting of the rice was delayed for a decade by opponents; it's only now being planted in the Philippines. Another genetically modified type of rice can "breathe under water for two weeks," which would make it invaluable in countries like Bangladesh, which experience severe flooding that now wipes out crops. Article from Lincoln Journal Star.

2011 Plant Science Symposium

The 2011 Plant Science Symposium was held October 14 at the Sheldon Museum of Art on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln campus. Attendees enjoyed a day filled with renowned plant experts and discussion on plant signaling in response to abiotic & biotic stress. More about Symposium.


Dr.Basset
Assistant Professor Gilles Basset named a recipient of the Junior Faculty Excellence in Research Award
This honor attests to the excellence of Gilles Basset's research program and to the potential that he has to make outstanding contributions in the future. The Junior Faculty for Excellence in Research award is presented by the Agricultural Research Division in the Institute of Agricultural and Natural Resources. More about the award.



Faculty Receive NSF Grants

The Center for Plant Science Innovation is pleased to highlight multiple projects that recently received funding from the National Science Foundation.

Heriberto Cerutti, Professor, School of Biological Sciences
Title: Histone H3 Phosphorylation and Gene Silencing in Chlamydomonas and Arabidopsis
Awarded: March 1, 2011

Sally Mackenzie, Ralph and Alice Raikes Professor, Department of Agronomy/Horticulture and School of Biological Sciences
Title: GEPR: Intersection of the Plant Epigenome and Bioenergetics in Phenotypy
Awarded: September 1, 2011

Bin Yu, Assistant Professor, School of Biological Sciences
Title: Understanding DAWDLE Function in miRNA and siRNA Biogenesis
Awarded: September 1, 2011

Harkamal Walia, Assistant Professor, Department of Agronomy and Horticulture
Title: Early Seed Development Under Stressful Environments
Awarded: September 1, 2011

Jeff Mower, Assistant Professor, Department of Agronomy and Horticulture
Title: Tracing Processes of Genome Evolution using Plantaginaceae
Awarded: September 15, 2011

News Archives
Faculty Receive NSF Grants

The Center for Plant Science Innovation is pleased to highlight multiple projects that recently received funding from the National Science Foundation.

Heriberto Cerutti, Professor, School of Biological Sciences
Title: Histone H3 Phosphorylation and Gene Silencing in Chlamydomonas and Arabidopsis
Awarded: March 1, 2011

Sally Mackenzie, Ralph and Alice Raikes Professor, Department of Agronomy/Horticulture and School of Biological Sciences
Title: GEPR: Intersection of the Plant Epigenome and Bioenergetics in Phenotypy
Awarded: September 1, 2011

Bin Yu, Assistant Professor, School of Biological Sciences
Title: Understanding DAWDLE Function in miRNA and siRNA Biogenesis
Awarded: September 1, 2011

Harkamal Walia, Assistant Professor, Department of Agronomy and Horticulture
Title: Early Seed Development Under Stressful Environments
Awarded: September 1, 2011

Jeff Mower, Assistant Professor, Department of Agronomy and Horticulture
Title: Tracing Processes of Genome Evolution using Plantaginaceae
Awarded: September 15, 2011

World Food Prize Laureate Swaminathan Opens IANR Heuermann Lectures

On Monday, Oct. 10, Dr. M.S. Swaminathan, the world's first World Food Prize laureate, opened a new lecture series on meeting the world's growing food needs. The participation of Swaminathan, known as the Father of the Green Revolution in India, comes at the invitation of University of Nebraska President James B. Milliken and the Robert B. Daugherty Water for Food Institute. In March 2011, Milliken and Swaminathan jointly hosted a symposium in Chennai, India, on managing water resources for food security, sponsored by the Indo-US Science and Technology Forum.

The new Heuermann Lectures in the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources at UNL are open to the public, made possible through a gift from B. Keith and Norma Heuermann of Phillips, long-time university supporters with a strong commitment to Nebraska's production agriculture, natural resources, rural areas and people. More about Heuermann Lecture Series.

Big Ten scientists, all National Academy members, to talk at UNL

Big 10Some of the Big Ten Conference's most distinguished scientists are coming to Lincoln. The Biotechnology/Life Sciences Seminar Series will feature presentations by Big Ten faculty who are all members of the National Academy of Sciences. Presenters include James Van Etten, professor of plant pathology and a National Academy member. Van Etten organized the lecture series to note UNL's admission into the Big Ten Conference. More information and complete schedule.

Sunday with a Scientist: Feeding the World in the 21st Century

Dr. Holding On Sunday, Sept. 18, researchers from the UNL Center for Plant Science Innovation participated in the Nebraska State Museum's Sunday with a Scientist program, exploring plant science. The program, "Feeding the World in the 21st Century," provided hands-on activities to help explain the important role of plant science in addressing the world's food demands. Plants are a critical part of human and livestock nutrition. Today's crop varieties and growing technologies are not sufficient to meet our future needs, as the global population is expected to reach over 10 billion by 2050.


Life Sciences Initiative funds a dozen projects

Twelve projects proposed by interdisciplinary teams received seed funding in the UNL Life Sciences Initiative's inaugural competitive grants program. Center for Plant Science Innovation faculty are included among the teams that received funding. The internal grants competition encourages faculty to build multidisciplinary teams across departments, centers and colleges to tackle new life sciences research projects. Jointly funded by the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources and the Office of Research and Economic Development, the grants are for two years and funding begins July 1. Grants support initial research so teams can gather the preliminary data needed to compete more successfully for external funding.
Read more about projects.

UNL plant pathologist James Alfano elected APS FellowAlfano

James Alfano, Charles Bessey professor of plant pathology and member of the Center for Plant Science Innovation at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, has been elected a fellow of the American Phytopathological Society, an international scientific organization devoted to the study of plant diseases. The society has nearly 5,000 plant pathologists and scientists worldwide.

Fellow recognition is based on significant contribution in one or more of the following areas: original research, teaching, administration, professional and public service, and/or extension and outreach. This year, APS fellowships were awarded to nine members.

Alfano's research focuses on the type III secretion system (T3SS) of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and the effector proteins injected via the T3SS into plant cells by this model pathogen. The T3SS is central to the virulence of DC3000 and many other Gram-negative plant pathogens. Alfano has made major contributions to several aspects of our current understanding of this system, including the genomic context of the T3SS, the control of substrate traffic, the role of chaperones in effector delivery, the ability of various type III effectors in the DC3000 repertoire to suppress plant defenses, and the biochemical activity of two effectors, HopAO1 and HopU1. He is a major player in elucidating the genomic context for the T3SS in P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, and has made seminal contributions to our understanding of how the T3SS operates. The Alfano group also has made major advances in elucidating the mechanisms by which individual effectors can suppress plant defenses. His research has been funded by NSF, USDA-NRI, and NIH NIAID. He and other new fellows will be honored Aug. 6 in Honolulu during the annual meeting of APS. Read more about the recognition.

Students Get Hands-On Experience in Plant Science
Linciln East StudentsThe Center for Plant Science Innovation welcomed science students from Lincoln East High School in March 2011. During the visit, students participated in lab activities focused on biochemistry, plant breeding and genetics, and plant biology. Activities included extracting and purifying plant lipids, extracting DNA from soybean leaves, and learning about gel electrophoresis. Laboratories participating in this event include: Clemente Lab, Cahoon Lab, Stone Lab, Alfano Lab, and Harris Lab. Photo: Students follow procedures for extracting and purifying plant lipids under the direction of Cahoon lab member Tara Nazarenus, who uses these procedures routinely in her work.

2011 American Society for Plant Biologists Midwestern Section Meeting

ASPBA group of faculty, staff and graduate students from the Center for Plant Science Innovation attended the 2011 Midwestern American Society for Plant Biologists meeting March 19-20 at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind. Attendees included Dr. Ed Cahoon, Dr. Bin Yu, Joshua Widhalm, Anne-Lise Ducluzeau, Emerson Crabill, Saadia Bihmidine and Lindsay Pape. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln will host the next section meeting March 24-25, 2012. View the meeting program and abstracts.



Center for Plant Science Innovation welcomes Women in Science participants

Women in ScienceOn Saturday, Feb. 19, the Center for Plant Science Innovation welcomed high school students participating in the 2011 Women in Science Conference at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. This valuable and rewarding conference, now in its 13th year, encourages high school women to pursue their interests in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. The students are given multiple opportunities to meet professional women and current University of Nebraska-Lincoln science majors. Tours of the UNL campuses, including a behind-the-scenes look at researchers' laboratories in the George W. Beadle Center, are highlights of the conference. "It is exciting to see the young women think about careers in science. Many of them have never had an opportunity to experience a science lab, so it is fun to see them envision what working in a lab means. Science careers are not limited to doctors or nurses. There are many different options available," said Becky Cahoon, lab manager for the Cahoon laboratory. Laboratories participating in this year's conference include: Alfano Lab (Dr. Anna Block), Cahoon Lab (Becky Cahoon, MS), Clemente Lab (Shirley Sato, MS) and Stone Lab (Dr. Julie Stone). Details about the event.

2010

New projects on algal biology, nanohybrids, part of EPSCoR NSF award Weeks

Two new research centers at the University of Nebraskaâ??Lincoln one on algal biology and another on nanohybrid research received a more than $11 million boost this week from a National Science Foundation award. The funding award is the major part of a five-year, $20 million Nebraska EPSCoR grant, involving 29 faculty from seven disciplines at five institutions, including UNL. Read more about grant and the faculty from the Center for Plant Science Innovation invovled.

Camelina Has Potential as Biofuels Crop in Western Nebraska

Ed CahoonThere may never be huge expanses of camelina growing in Nebraska, but it just might fill a niche in the western part of the state as an oilseed crop well-suited for bio-based oil applications. University of Nebraska-Lincoln scientists Ed Cahoon and Tom Clemente recently received a $500,000, three-year grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to research the crop's potential for development of industrial lubricants. Camelina, a yellow-flowering oilseed crop that grows one to three feet tall, has some particular advantages over other oilseeds as an industrial oil crop, said Cahoon, a lipid biochemist and molecular biologist.

Center for Plant Science Innovation announces new director

After more than 10 years of service, Dr. Sally Mackenzie has stepped down as director to focus more of her time on research and recruitment. Dr. Ed Cahoon, professor of biochemisty, has been named the new director of the center. He came to UNL in 2008 from the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center.
Read more about Drs. Sally Mackenzie and Ed Cahoon.

India partners in crop improvements

Drs. Ed Cahoon and Thomas Clemente with the university's Center for Plant Science Innovation, and Agronomist Dr. Ismail Dweikat, were a part of a group traveling to ICRISAT (International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics) at Hyderabad, India in February to further relationships between ICRISAT and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The trip is beneficial for plant breeders to make personalized connections, and is a continuation of the February 2009 visit to India with several UNL representatives led by Chancellor Harvey Perlman to begin establishing relationships between the university and India. Read more about the plant science research relationship with India.