October 30th - November 3rd

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English Advising Office October 30th - November 3rd

Hours

The English Advising Office is open Monday through Thursday for appointments from 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m., and Friday for walk-in sessions 8:30 a.m. to noon.

Appointments

Please go to MyPlan or call 402-472-3871 to schedule an appointment.

Walk-in Hours

No appointment necessary

Walk-in hours are Fridays from 8:30 am - 12:00 pm.

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Table of Contents

English Student Spotlight Stay Woke: Readings in Social Justice Department of English Announcements and Events University Announcements and Events Jobs and Internships Community Events Literary News Film News Other Announcements

English Student Spotlight

Send us your story!
Photo of Emma Himes

Emma Himes

Senior Emma Himes is in her second semester of her research project working with the Willa Cather Archive at UNL. After receiving a UCARE grant her junior year, she now codes Cather’s letters in the computer language R in order to analyze them.

Her work is part of a larger project, led in part by the archive’s editor, and Himes’ advisor, Andrew Jewell.

“Emma is distinctive in that she came in with a very specific research idea,” Jewell said. “She was able to learn about the project that we’re doing, and then go in her own distinct direction to try some text analysis methodologies. She’s very motivated and has been a good person to challenge me in my own thinking.”

The archive, which is the largest in the world, according to Jewell, currently houses between 500 and 600 letters. The archive’s team is working to digitize all existing letters, which is about 3,000. They first code them in Extensible Markup Language, then Himes takes the XML and pulls it out into R, which is used for statistical analysis.

According to Himes, R is the best language for processing text. She uses it to analyze the text for word frequency, among other things.

“Word frequency is a really great indicator of writing style,” Himes said. “Everyone’s is different. You can tell who the author of something is just by their word frequencies.”

Jewell has been working on the archive since 2004, and for the last three years has been working on a National Endowment for the Humanities grant. The project behind the grant will result in a website, free to the public, where visitors can read digitized and analyzed copies of Cather’s letters. The website will go up in January 2018.

When it’s all said and done, Himes’ work will help visitors search for specific topics and keywords in the letters without having to sift through them all.

Himes said she started at UNL with strengths in English and Spanish. Needing to narrow those disciplines down, she chose digital humanities as a concentration.

“I can challenge myself with the English major, but it’s not necessarily asking me to do something I’ve never done before or pushing me outside my comfort zone,” Himes said. “Digital humanities is forcing me to learn new skills that I have never been expected to know.”

Himes is an English, Spanish and global studies triple major, with minors in Latin American studies, digital humanities, history and ethnic studies. She has an English concentration in digital humanities, as well as global studies concentrations in Latin American studies and human rights and culture.

Finding a career that allows Himes to continue practicing each of her passions isn’t simple. However, she said STEM has allowed each of those passions to come together. Himes said she is ready to take on the role of being a woman in STEM.

“[STEM] is something that I’ve become really passionate about and I feel like it’s the way to make my career very feasible and possible,” Himes said. “Since I have this humanities background, when I combine it with STEM, I feel that I’m kind of jumping into this area that a lot of other people don’t do, kind of a little niche area.”

Both Himes and Jewell spoke positively of how accessible the Willa Cather Archive website will be to anyone who wants to view it. This represents a value that carries into Himes’ work in digital humanities.

“It is my hope that digital humanities will offer tools and access, mostly through archival efforts, to equalize accessibility to educational and historical documents,” Himes said.

news@dailynebraskan.com

Stay Woke: Readings in Social Justice

We Are Closer Than Ever to 1930s-Style Totalitarianism: Atwood

"The world is closer to the dark days of the 1930s than at any time since, Canadian author Margaret Atwood said on Saturday in Frankfurt, where she was due to receive a prestigious German literary award." Continue reading here

Professors and Free Speech

"Groups with strong political beliefs have seized upon statements made by professors and provoked backlashes against them and their institutions. Sometimes the public response has been so threatening that the faculty members were afraid to show up on their campus, or college officials feared what might happen if they continued to teach. This 28-page collection describes what happened to professors who ended up in the political cross-hairs, and how their universities responded to the uproar." For more information, click here

Milo’s Coming

Faculty, not students, should decide who gets to speak on campus. Continue reading here

Clemson Student Leader, Who Sat During Pledge of Allegiance as Protest, Is Impeached

"Jaren Stewart, Clemson University’s student-body vice president who sat in protest during the Pledge of Allegiance, has been impeached by the student senate, the Associated Press reports. But a spokesman for the university, John Gouch, told the AP that the move to impeach Mr. Stewart began before he started protesting." Continue reading here

BuzzFeed Has Style Too

"A World Without Whom: The Essential Guide to Language in the Buzzfeed Age" by Emmy J. Favilla, Buzzfeed Copy Chief. Continue reading here

Queer Filipinx/Pilipinx Poetics: Celebrating Filipino American History Month

In recognition of Filipino American History Month, writer Kay Ulanday Barrett asked three poets with Philippine ancestry to share their ideas and inspirations. Continue reading here

U. of North Dakota Professor Resigns, Citing Rejection of Proposed Lectures on Pipeline Protests

"A journalism professor at the University of North Dakota resigned on Thursday after he said the institution had rejected his proposal to lead a lecture series on protests over the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline." Continue reading here

The Survival of British English

"It is a truism universally acknowledged (by Britons) that Americanisms are taking over British English." Continue reading here

Black Lives Matter

Kara Walker’s images comprise an army of the unlikely, those grotesques and comics that white people invented in the effort to persuade themselves—and black people as well—that black people were only fit for servitude, and that they were incapable of and uninterested in revolt. Walker turns against whiteness what white people invented. Continue reading here

The Work You Do, the Person You Are

"The pleasure of being necessary to my parents was profound. I was not like the children in folktales: burdensome mouths to feed, nuisances to be corrected, problems so severe that they were abandoned to the forest." Continue reading here

Department of English Announcements and Events

Ronald Judy: Part 1 Lecture

In case you missed it, watch Ronald Judy's Humanities on the Edge lecture here

Spring 2018: English 331

Consider enrolling in ENGL 331: British Women Poets of the Romantic Period!

11:00-12:15 TR Spring Semester with Professor Stephen Behrendt

Download more information here.

Houseguest Magazine Call for Submissions

Houseguest Magazine is currently looking for submissions to be submitted by November 15th!

As explained on their website, " Houseguest: House, Guest. As our name implies, we are interested in the juxtaposition of the common and the strange: the stranger that enters, that invades even as it’s invited, that may never truly leave. As a culture, we are ambivalent about houseguests, and ambivalent about ambivalence. Here at Houseguest, we value ambivalence. We appreciate uncertainty. We espouse contradiction. We love thresholds—liminal spaces and surreal situations—and watching what gets through, what gets in. We welcome the Welcome Unwelcome. We welcome anything you see fit to send us, provided it has not been previously published elsewhere."

Website: https://www.houseguestmag.com/issue-09/current.php

Submit to Mochica Review Fiction Contest

The Mochila Review's Undergraduate MoRe Prize offers prestige and prize money to one talented undergraduate writer. In this, the fourth year of the contest, we're accepting only fiction submissions, which will be judged by the New York Times-bestselling novelist Melissa de la Cruz. The author whose story she selects as the winner will receive $50 and publication in our 2018 issue.

A few more facts about the contest: you must currently be an undergraduate student to submit. The submission deadline is Dec. 1. You can upload your story on our website here: http://www.mochilareview.com/more-prize/. There's a small fee of $5 to submit.

Narrative--Fall Story Contest

Narrative’s Fall Story Contest is open to all writers, and all entries will be considered for publication.

      • $2,500 First Prize
      • $1,000 Second Prize
      • $500 Third Prize
      • Ten finalists receive $100 each

See the Guidelines. Read prior winners, and view recent awards won by Narrative authors.

Since 2003 Narrative has proudly published emerging writers alongside established authors, and we continue to look for exciting, meaningful new writing.

Narrative reaches a worldwide audience of 250,000 readers, and our contest winners and finalists have seen their exposure in Narrative bring great attention to their work.

Works from Narrative often appear in collections such as the Best American Short Stories, the O. Henry Prize Stories, the Pushcart Prize series, and many others.

We look forward to reading your work.

Upcoming Pre-Law Events

Criminal Justice Student Association Speaker:

Wednesday, November 1, at 5:30 p.m., Nebraska Hall room 511

You are invited to attend our Criminal Justice Student Association meeting with guest speaker Dennis O’Keefe. O’Keefe has been a public defender for Lancaster County for over 30 years.

Midwest Law School Virtual Fair:

Tuesday, November 7, from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Central

This free virtual fair allows prospective law school students to visit with admission representatives from Law Schools around the Midwest. To register and see the law school schedules, go to https://www.careereco.com/Fair/EventDetails?fairId=e9352d29-e307-4b32-be49-a6d70156dd4f. Sponsored by the Midwest Alliance for Law School Admissions and the Midwest Association of Prelaw Advisors.

Creighton Law School Open House:

Tuesday, November 7, from 1 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

Creighton Law School is hosting an open house at their Omaha, NE, campus for students interested in learning more about their law school program. See attached flyer for more information. Please RSVP through this link: https://choose.creighton.edu/register/?id=7478ff96-5e4d-4dd4-8dd4-16fc6e56e99f. For questions, please contact BarbaraKaye Miller at BarbaraKayeMiller@creighton.edu.

Download more information here.

National Willa Cather Center Receives Accolades

We are honored that our National Willa Cather Center recently received two awards to recognize restoration of the historic Moon Block building in which it resides and to honor its popularity as an emerging tourist attraction. Our NWCC was awarded the 2017 Nebraska Preservation Award from the Nebraska State Historical Society and was named the 2017 Outstanding Tourism Attraction by the Nebraska Tourism Commission.

From the MFA in Creative Writing at Stony Brook Southampton + Manhattan

Thinking about graduate study in the New York area? The MFA in Creative Writing at Stony Brook Southampton is an especially appealing option for project-driven writers: we don't track by genre, so students can take whichever workshops are best suited to their advancement, building their own track through the MFA. We're also sensitive to returning students, offering job-compatible courses in the evenings and weekends, at both Manhattan and Southampton campuses. Roger Rosenblatt and Star Black have recently offered such non-traditional formats.

Our faculty consists overwhelmingly of working writers who choose to teach here because they care about mentoring up-and-coming voices. In addition to Roger and Star, it includes Melissa Bank, Billy Collins, Cornelius Eady, Neal Gabler, Ursula Hegi, Amy Hempel, Patricia Marx, Susan Minot, and Meg Wolitzer, among others. Our reading series and the Southampton Writers Conference, directed by Susan Scarf Merrell, attract world-class visiting writers and editors like Brit Bennett, Natalie Diaz, and Sharon Olds.

Many of our students teach undergraduate creative writing courses to our minors. Others get involved with The Southampton Review, our literary magazine, edited by Lou Ann Walker. Our class sizes are small and our approach, rigorous but friendly. We're affordable, too. NY State residents pay approximately $500 per credit, and a number of outstanding applicants are awarded Assistantships, with tuition breaks and stipends.

Summer Fellowship Opportunity in Humanities, Social Sciences and Fine Arts

The Moore Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program (MURAP) invites applications for a ten-week paid summer research internship for undergraduate students (rising juniors or seniors) in the humanities, social sciences, and fine arts. The program will be held from May 21 to July 25, 2018 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. MURAP seeks to prepare talented and motivated underrepresented students from racially and ethnically diverse backgrounds, or those with a proven commitment to diversity and to eradicating racial disparities in graduate school and the academy, for graduate study in fields in the humanities, social sciences, and fine arts. The program provides students with a rigorous research experience under the guidance of a UNC faculty mentor.

Each participant will receive:

  • Generous stipend
  • Campus housing
  • Meal allowance
  • Writing, Communication Skills and Professional Development workshops
  • GRE prep course (and all necessary materials)
  • Paid domestic travel expenses to and from Chapel Hill

The student application will be available online starting November 3, 2018 and the application deadline is February 9, 2018. For more details about the program, please see the attached announcement and flyer. To access an application, or for additional information about MURAP, please visit our website at http://www.murap.unc.edu or contact Mimi Gordor, Program Coordinator, at murap@unc.edu.

Download more information here.

Professor Rhonda Garelick's Latest

Literary Craft Therapy

Students, faculty and staff of the English Department are invited to drop by Bailey Library between 9:30 and 11:30 on December 5 for some literary craft therapy at Letterpress Day. Prof. Gailey's American Poetry class will pre-select lines of poetry they will set in type, and you may come by and print off a bookmark or displayable item on the historic press.

National Novel Writing Month: Pep Talk from Roxane Gay

Continue reading here

University Announcements and Events

Spring 2018: English 373

Poster for English 373

Sustainability Presentation Series on November 2nd

Sustainability Leadership Presentation Series-  Nov 2nd 3:30PM "A New Garden Ethic: Cultivating Defiant Compassion for an Uncertain Future"

Download more information here.

Military & Veteran Success Center Learn to Earn on Nov. 2nd and Nov. 7th

Presented collaboratively by the Military & Veteran Success Center and Career Services, please join us on Thursday, November 2 from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. in the Military & Veteran Success Center located at 16 Nebraska Union for a Learn to Earn Over Lunch Professional School Spotlight featuring the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Also, please join us on Tuesday, November 7 from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. in the Military & Veteran Success Center located at 16 Nebraska Union for a Learn to Earn Over Lunch sponsored by Wells Fargo. 

Free lunch will be provided and a Career Advisor will be present to help students explore majors and answer questions regarding the medical profession.

If you have any questions, please contact the Military & Veteran Success Center at 402-472-4130 or Career Services at 402-472-3145.

Download more information here.

Info Sessions for Winter Service-Study ASB

Join the Center for Civic Engagement next week at the following info session dates to learn more about our Winter Service-Study ASB to Fresno, CA where we will study and serve our national parks, migrant workers, and solar energy:
Oct. 31 at 4PM; Nov. 1 at 12PM; Nov. 2 at 4PM. All info sessions will take place in 222 NE Union.

More details at https://engage.unl.edu/service-study-asb

Rep to Stage the Unconventional 'Serpent'

The Nebraska Repertory Theatre's 2017-18 season continued with “The Serpent." The production opens at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 3 in the Temple Building. For more information, click here

You're Invited: Nebraska Lecture (November 8, 2017)

Faculty, Staff, and Students:

Sharing the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's research and scholarship in a public forum is one way we can demonstrate the impact of our faculty's hard work and dedication. I hope you will join me at 3:30 p.m. November 8 for Matt Waite's Nebraska Lecture, part of the Chancellor's Distinguished Lecture Series.

I am delighted to have Matt presenting the fall lecture. He is a national expert in drone journalism and established the country's first Drone Journalism Lab right here at Nebraska. In this engaging lecture, Matt will explain why a cohesive legal framework is necessary for the Drone Age to reach its full potential in the U.S. His work is a great example of how interdisciplinary work is necessary to solve societal challenges, great and small, and develop effective public policy.

The Nebraska Lectures are designed to give some of our top faculty a forum in which to share their important work with people across campus and the broader Lincoln community. Please help us spread the word.  

If you can't attend the lecture in person at the Nebraska Union, you can watch the live webcast at research.unl.edu/nebraskalectures/ or follow @UNLresearch on Twitter for updates.

I am looking forward to seeing you at the Nebraska Lecture. Go Big Red!

Ronnie

Book Signing, Exhibition Mark Comic's Release

A reception and book signing for the new educational comic "Carnival of Contagion," the latest entry in the World of Viruses series, will take place from 5 to 7 p.m. Nov. 7 on the second floor of Love Library South, 1400 R St. For more information, click here

First Friday Includes Fashion Show, Book Signing, Dance Performances

University of Nebraska–Lincoln museums and galleries will offer extended hours and free admission Nov. 3, as part of the First Friday Art Walk. In addition, each location will offer one-of-a-kind entertainment to accompany the exhibitions on display. For more information, click here

British National Debate Team vs. Nebraska Speech and Debate Team on Nov. 7

British National Debate Vs. Nebraska Speech and Debate Team

November 7th, 2017 at 7:00 PM at the Lied Center

"Is Regulation of Social Media Necessary to Protect Democracy?"

Chuck and Linda Wilson Dialogue

Sponsored by the Department of Communication Studies and the Center for Civic Engagement

Since 1922, the National Communication Association has sponsored international student exchange tours for the purpose of promoting debate, discussion, and intercultural communication. Renowned for their wit, humor, and eloquence, members of the United Kingdom’s English-Speaking Union tour the United States each year, debating the best and the brightest at our institutions of higher learning. The list of tour alumni include a British Prime Minister, a Leader of the Opposition, an Archbishop of Canterbury, and many senior politicians, journalists, and businesspeople. It promises to be educational and entertaining for those interested in communication, civic engagement, international relations, and global politics. The event will be moderated by Aaron Duncan, UNL Director of Speech & Debate.

Jobs and Internships

Apply for Spring Engl 495 English Advising Internship

The English Advising Office is seeking an English and/or Film Studies major for the spring 2018 internship. Students interested in educational administration and advising are encouraged to apply for this opportunity to work with the English Undergraduate advisor and English Department Office staff.

The English Advising intern will serve as a student leader in the department's freshmen mentoring program and will learn about the profession of academic advising in its global context, college student service, department resources, administration of academic policies and procedures, and curriculum.

Interns will network with other student leaders, assist with advising and student service projects, contribute to English department recruitment efforts, and create or update handouts and web resources.

Note: 3 credit hours, 9 hours per week required in the English Advising Office.

To apply, complete the steps below:

Email Kelly Payne (kpayne2@unl.edu) to turn in a cover letter and resume. The cover letter should focus on why you are interested in the internship and how it will help you develop professional literacy and experience.

Ask a UNL English faculty member to email Kelly a brief recommendation that speaks to your ability to represent the department based on achievements in major classes.

An interview with the English advisor may be required.

Apply for Spring Engl 495 Nebraska’s Literary Heritage Internship

The mission of the Jane Pope Geske Heritage Room of Nebraska Authors is to celebrate, preserve and promote the individual and the collective work of Nebraska authors.  Students will be introduced to the regional literature of the Great Plains through the study of the books, personal papers, ephemera and other primary resources held in the Heritage Room.  Interns will report to the Curator of the Heritage Room, Erin Willis. Kelly Payne will serve as the instructor of record for this Engl 495 section.  The department will accept one intern for the 2018 spring semester.  For more information on the Jane Pope Geske Heritage Room of Nebraska Authors, visit: www.lincolnlibraries.org/heritage-room-of-nebraska-authors/

Requirements include:

- Reading and reviewing the literary works, news articles and vertical files (correspondence, book reviews, personal records, news articles, etc.) of Nebraska authors.

-Synthesizing information to creative narratives for Nebraska authors that can be used for webpages, databases and physical displays.

-Writing and editing book reviews for publication in local/regional newsletters and newspapers

-Utilizing web databases to trace the histories and relationships of Nebraska Authors.

-Manipulating data and using basic HTML functions to update the Nebraska Author database, a website developed by the UNL Center for Digital Research in the Humanities.

-Using social media to share information about Heritage Room collection items and special events

-Creating physical displays of books and primary documents by utilizing archival methods for storage and display.

-Assisting with the curatorial responsibilities of selecting authors and materials for inclusion in the Heritage Room collection, including new and emerging Nebraska authors.

Learning Objectives

Heritage Room interns may expect to learn:

-about the Nebraska Authors, past and present, and the Nebraska Literary Tradition.

-to recognize literary themes and identifying features of Great Plains literature.

-to synthesize a volume of information an create brief biographical sketches of authors and their works.

-to understand and describe the cultures that contribute to the body of Nebraska literature.

-to create narratives of Nebraska authors through their relationships with each other and through common themes in writing.

-to conduct research using primary documents and web databases.

-to make personal connections with authors through social media, book signings and direct contact with local authors.

-to recognize the identifying features of rare and valuable literary items.

-to utilize archival tools for storage and display of rare materials.

Assessment

Grades will be rewarded based on, 1.) the completeness of database records for a variety of Nebraska authors that includes: a narrative author profile, a bibliography of work, and accurate biographical information;  2.)  a physical display that includes a narrative theme connecting a variety of Nebraska authors, their physical books, primary documents and ephemera.

Application Process

Qualified applicants should have:

  • an interest in the literature of Nebraska.
  • an interest in archival methods.
  • a competency with, or willingness to learn, research databases and database construction.

Please submit the following documents by email to Erin Willis (heritage@lincolnlibraries.org) and copy Kelly Payne (kpayne2@unl.edu)

1.            Academic Resume

2.            Cover letter

 Your cover letter should be addressed to Erin Willis (Curator, Jane Pope Geske Heritage Room of Nebraska Authors) and Kelly Payne (English Advisor)

Apply for Spring Engl 495 Intro to New York Publishing Internship

Students will be introduced to the New York publishing industry through related activities at Curtis Brown, Ltd. Interns will report to agent Noah Ballard. Kelly Payne will serve as the instructor of record for this Engl 495 section. The department will accept several interns for spring 2018, and will award each intern $500 from the Nordbrock English Experiential Learning Fund. For more information on Curtis Brown, Ltd. and the agents see: www.curtisbrown.com

Requirements include:

-Appraisal of 2-3 fiction manuscripts and/or non-fiction proposals per week. Readings will come from the literary agent's slush pile, referrals, and submissions from conferences.

-Composition of regular reader's reports which focus on 1) a narrative summary of the text at hand, 2) analysis of potential reading audiences, and 3) judgment about "fit" of the text for the literary agent and publishing venues.

-Research of publishing houses (both major trade and small independents) as well as literary magazines and journals, becoming familiar with tastes and markets.

-Assisting agents on potential submissions with an emphasis on comparable titles, audience markets and author platforms.

-One trip to NYC:  to shadow Mr. Ballard; to tour publishing houses and network with industry professionals; and to attend readings. Travel arrangements and funding beyond the Nordbrock English Experiential Learning Fund reward are the students' responsibility. Students must hold pre-travel meeting with English advisor and complete the UNL Student Trip Insurance form: http://hr.unl.edu/benefits/riskmanagement/studenttrip.shtml/

Learning Objectives: New York publishing interns may expect to learn:

-about the New York Publishing industry and the roles of literary agents.

-to read and respond to numerous contemporary fiction manuscripts on a weekly basis.

-to articulate one’s reading tastes and acquire knowledge of contemporary publishing trends.

-to apply critical strategies and assess the quality of manuscripts, as well as their marketability and relationship to other recent publications.

-the application of research skills to the publishing industry including how to research magazines, journals, and publishing houses.

- to compose alternate and comparable title lists, audience and market reports, and other aspects of the submission process.

-to weigh feedback and develop professional communication skills.

-to network with publishing professionals at meetings, pitches, launch parties, readings, and other activities.

-to present professional writing in a course portfolio, which must include 1) sample written work from the aforementioned objectives, 2) updated professional resume using industry models and feedback from Mr. Ballard, 3) sample cover letter/application for future positions, and 3) 5-page reflection that addresses how the internship corresponds to the learning objectives of the English major. Students will turn in their portfolio at the end of the term.

Assessment:

Grades will be rewarded based on the quality of submitted writing (presented in the portfolio) and a review by the on-site supervisor following the trip to New York City.

Application Process:

Qualified applicants should have:

-Preference will be given to student who have completed related courses or internship experiences.

Examples of such opportunities include: Engl 355, 498 Legal Aspects of Creative Activity (w/Prof. Dooling), Engl 495 Prairie Schooner Internship, Laurus editorial board experience, U of Nebraska Press Editorial or Acquisitions internship, and Daily Nebraskan editorial experience, among others.

Please submit the following documents by email to Mr. Noah Ballard (nb@cbltd.com) and Professor Timothy Schaffert (tschaffert2@unl.edu) by November 15th:

  1. Academic Resume
  2. Cover letter: Your cover letter should be addressed to Noah Ballard (Literary Agent, Curtis Brown, Ltd.) and Kelly Payne (English Advisor) and should answer the following questions: How does this internship fit into your career goals for the next few years? What do you read and what is your familiarity with current publishing trends?

Humanities Weekly Husker Hire Link Jobs & Internships Bulletin

University of Nebraska Career Services encourages you to view a few of our new Full-Time Job and Internship opportunities from

Husker Hire Link (HHL).  For a full list of full-time opportunities, internships or part-time jobs visit careers.unl.edu/hhl.

Download more information here.

From Liberal Arts to Making a Living

Critical-thinking skills and a broad education aren’t enough. Small colleges are making career services a priority too. Continue reading here

Local Job Opportunity for Filmmakers

Capehart Family Dentistry is looking for someone to complete a project that will need to be around 10 minutes long. They want it to incorporate photos from their past events, possibly some of their own video clips, as well as live footage of interviews, and maybe a few skits. This project is paid.

If interested, send Olivia an email at: marketing@capehartdental.com

Internships at Asian Center

Minority Health & Support Internship

Purpose: To learn, practice, and implement program development and provide support to the staff by carrying out mission–related tasks at a nonprofit charitable agency, but also experience other aspects of non-profit management including grant writing, marketing, and website and social media development.

Period: Approximately 12 hours per week, from January 15, 2018, through May 10, 2018.  (Basic weekly schedule to be provided; school breaks will be time off.) If applicable, total hours dependent on credits (approx. 50 service hours = 1 credit).

Required Duties & Skills:

  • Support staff and evaluation of Minority Health Program with data collection, reporting, production of educational materials and analysis.
  • Assist staff in creating program content and participate in implementing program, as needed
  • Attend and successfully complete all required training programs, staff meetings and complete all related assignments in a timely manner
  • Work directly with clients and program participants
  • Communicate in a friendly and informative manner with people from a wide variety of cultural and ethnic backgrounds 
  • Must have good computer skills and be proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, Internet and e-mail.
  • Act as a representative of the ACCC in public forums in a positive, knowledgeable and professional manner
  • Provide accurate and timely reporting of work performed and outcomes in the form of database management and a written report to the supervisor at the completion of project or time served
  • Greet and assist clients whenever needed. Collaborating with human service agencies and other resources to refer services for the refugees and immigrants.
  • Perform related duties and responsibilities as required.
  • Schedule 2-4 hours per week to do general office assistance such as answering the phone, filing, and other duties as assigned.

Submit Resume and Letter of Application to:

Asian Community & Cultural Center

144 N 44th Street, Ste A

Lincoln, NE 68503      

402-477-3446

Or cristina@lincolnasiancenter.org

Grant Writing & Resource Development Internship

Purpose: To learn, practice, and implement grant writing and resource development and provide support to the staff by carrying out mission–related tasks at a nonprofit charitable agency, but also experience other aspects of non-profit management including program development, marketing, and website and social media development.

Period: Approximately 12 hours per week, from January 15, 2018, through May 10, 2018.  (Basic weekly schedule to be provided; school breaks will be time off.) If applicable, total hours dependent on credits (approx. 50 service hours = 1 credit).

Required Duties & Skills:

  • Assist staff in writing grant proposals and managing fundraising resource development (CRD)
  • Attend and successfully complete all required training programs, staff meetings and complete all related assignments in a timely manner
  • Complete at least two projects designed with staff
  • Communicate in a friendly and informative manner with people from a wide variety of cultural and ethnic backgrounds 
  • Must have good computer skills and be proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, Internet and e-mail.
  • Act as a representative of the ACCC in public forums in a positive, knowledgeable and professional manner
  • Provide accurate and timely reporting of work performed and outcomes in the form of database management and a monthly report to the supervisor
  • Greet and assist clients whenever needed. Collaborating with human service agencies and other resources to refer services for the refugees and immigrants.
  • Perform related duties and responsibilities as required.
  • Schedule 2-4 hours per week to do general office assistance such as answering the phone, filing, and other duties as assigned.

Submit Resume and Letter of Application to:

Asian Community & Cultural Center

144 N 44 St, Ste A

Lincoln, NE 68503

402-477-3446

Or cristina@lincolnasiancenter.org

Marketing Internship

Purpose: The role of the marketing intern is to assist in creating marketing materials and community outreach to promote events and crate public awareness for our programs and community events. The marketing intern works with the program coordinator and collaborates with the marketing committee to plan and execute marketing campaigns.

Period: Approximately 12 hours per week, from January 15, 2018, through May 10, 2018.  (Basic weekly schedule to be provided; school breaks will be time off.) If applicable, total hours dependent on credits (approx. 50 service hours = 1 credit).

Required Duties & Skills:

  • Begin preparing for the Lunar New Year Festival, which takes place in February
  • Complete at least two projects designed with staff
  • Assist staff in creating and distributing promotional materials for all events and programs
  • Help to design and distribute monthly newsletter
  • Attend and successfully complete all required training programs, staff meetings and complete all related assignments in a timely manner
  • Communicate in a friendly and informative manner with people from a wide variety of cultural and ethnic backgrounds 
  • Must have good computer skills and be proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, Internet and e-mail.
  • Willingness to travel and transport in own personal vehicle, must have valid driver’s license and good driving record
  • Act as a representative of the ACCC in public forums in a positive, knowledgeable and professional manner
  • Provide accurate and timely reporting of work performed and outcomes in the form of database management and a written report to the supervisor at the completion of project or time served
  • Greet and assist clients whenever needed. Collaborating with human service agencies and other resources to refer services for the refugees and immigrants.
  • Perform related duties and responsibilities as required.
  • Schedule 2-4 hours per week to do general office assistance such as answering the phone, filing, and other duties as assigned.

Preferred Skills:

-Experience with HTML/CSS

-Marketing or graphic design experience (class projects count!)

Submit Resume and Letter of Application to:

Asian Community & Cultural Center

144 N. 44th Street Ste. A

Lincoln, NE 68503     

402-477-3446          

Or    cristina@lincolnasiancenter.org

Program Development & Support Internship

Purpose: To learn, practice, and implement program development and provide support to the staff by carrying out mission–related tasks at a nonprofit charitable agency, but also experience other aspects of non-profit management including grant writing, marketing, and website and social media development.

Period: Approximately 12 hours per week, from January 15, 2018, through May 10, 2018.  (Basic weekly schedule to be provided; school breaks will be time off.) If applicable, total hours dependent on credits (approx. 50 service hours = 1 credit).

Required Duties & Skills:

  • Assist staff in creating program content and participate in implementing programs
  • Attend and successfully complete all required training programs, staff meetings and complete all related assignments in a timely manner
  • Complete at least two projects designed with staff
  • Work directly with clients and program participants
  • Communicate in a friendly and informative manner with people from a wide variety of cultural and ethnic backgrounds 
  • Must have good computer skills and be proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, Internet and e-mail.
  • Act as a representative of the ACCC in public forums in a positive, knowledgeable and professional manner
  • Provide accurate and timely reporting of work performed and outcomes in the form of database management and a written report to the supervisor at the completion of project or time served
  • Greet and assist clients whenever needed. Collaborating with human service agencies and other resources to refer services for the refugees and immigrants.
  • Perform related duties and responsibilities as required.
  • Schedule 2-4 hours per week to do general office assistance such as answering the phone, filing, and other duties as assigned.

Submit Resume and Letter of Application to:

Asian Community & Cultural Center

144 N. 44th Street Ste. A

Lincoln, NE 68503 

402-477-3446        

Or         cristina@lincolnasiancenter.org          

Community Events

Humanities Nebraska- This Week's Events!

Friday, November 3rd

PENDER - 1 p.m.
Excess Baggage: Riding the Orphan Train • by Charlotte M. Endorf • at the Heritage Museum of Thurston County

STATEWIDE - 6:30 p.m.
Governor's Lecture rebroadcast • airing on NET Radio

LEXINGTON - 7 p.m.
Discussion on the "Looking Past Skin" exhibit • at the Dawson County Historical Society Museum

Visit HumanitiesNebraska.org for more events!

Literary News

What Are We Doing Here?

Why teach the humanities? Why study them? American universities are literally shaped around them, yet the question is put in the bluntest form—what are they good for? Continue reading here

Havana Libre Noir. Facebook Clunk. News 'n Notes. On-line Floricanto.

Continue reading here

The Best Reviewed Books of the Week

Featuring Philip Pullman, Oliver Sacks, Elizabeth Hardwick, Rolling Stone, and more. Continue reading here

Harry Potter and the Chair's Dilemma

"Recently, a colleague in the English department emailed me to confer about her topic for a forthcoming undergraduate seminar. The class is a new requirement, and we’re trying to get it right — attract students, challenge them, and send the message that English is a stimulating department for a major.

She suggested building the course around the Harry Potter books."

Continue reading here

A Year of Classic Children's Books in One Gift

The New York Review of Books Children’s Book Club

Whether you’re searching for a meaningful gift for a newborn, preschooler, or a reader of the ripe old age of 8–14, look no further.

We’ve grouped our most popular books by age and interest and will send one book every other month for an entire year to the fortunate recipient. And to add even more fun, with the initial volume we’ll also include a free squeaky duckie who loves to read while floating in the water, or sitting on a desk or bookshelf.

Orders must be received by December 5. We will then send the first book, along with the free Reader Duck, in December. The remaining five books will be sent in February, April, June, August, and October—with free shipping within the United States.

Poems for Native American Heritage Month

This November, celebrate the rich tradition of Native American poetry with these poems to read and share.

The Clans” by Richard Calmit Adams
Victory” by Sherman Alexie
Passive Voice” by Laura Da’
Peace Path” by Heid E. Erdrich
Remember” by Joy Harjo
Autumn” by Alexander Posey
Carrying Our Words” by Ofelia Zepeda

The Inventions of Witches

On witches, Derrida, and the impossibility of ever being truly known. Continue reading here

Meet National Book Award Finalist Elana K. Arnold

The author of What Girls Are Made Of on teen girls, twitter, and Agatha Christie. Continue reading here

9 Off-the-Beaten Path Horror Books to Read this Halloween

From comics anthologies to genre-bending novels and more. Continue reading here

Poem of the Day: A Rhyme for Halloween

A Rhyme for Halloween

By Maurice Kilwein Guevara

Tonight I light the candles of my eyes in the lee

And swing down this branch full of red leaves.

Yellow moon, skull and spine of the hare,

Arrow me to town on the neck of the air.

 

I hear the undertaker make love in the heather;

The candy maker, poor fellow, is under the weather.

Skunk, moose, raccoon, they go to the doors in threes

With a torch in their hands or pleas: "O, please . . ."

 

Baruch Spinoza and the butcher are drunk:

One is the tail and one is the trunk

Of a beast who dances in circles for beer

And doesn't think twice to learn how to steer.

 

Our clock is blind, our clock is dumb.

Its hands are broken, its fingers numb.

No time for the martyr of our fair town

Who wasn't a witch because she could drown.

 

Now the dogs of the cemetery are starting to bark

At the vision of her, bobbing up through the dark.

When she opens her mouth to gasp for air,

A moth flies out and lands in her hair.

The apples are thumping, winter is coming.

The lips of the pumpkin soon will be humming.

By the caw of the crow on the first of the year,

Something will die, something appear.

Film News

Showing This Week at the Ross

Oscar-Winning Cinematographer Walter Lassally Dies At 90

"Walter Lassally was the cinematographer on the 1964 film Zorba the Greek, for which he won an Academy Award. Lassally traveled the world telling epic stories through intimate images." Continue reading here

'Black Panther’ Costume Designer Ruth E. Carter on Injecting African Culture into the Film’s Fashion

"Ruth E. Carter has made a career of honoring black history through fashion. As the costume designer on films like Malcolm X, Selma, Do the Right Thing, Amistad and this year’s Marshall, the biopic centering on Thurgood Marshall, Carter has become the go-to person in her field for re-creating pivotal moments in black history and recalling people fighting for progress." Continue reading here

The Most Revealing Moment in the New Joan Didion Documentary

"About a third of the way through 'The Center Will Not Hold,' Griffin Dunne’s intimate, affectionate, and partial portrait of his aunt Joan Didion, which premières on Netflix this week, a riveting moment occurs." Continue reading here

November Films

Stanisław Lem, Postwar German Rediscoveries, “Black Soliders and World War II,” and more. Continue reading here

Small-Town Noir

The greatness of David Lynch’s art seems directly linked to the kitsch of his materials. Continue reading here

Black Jack Pershing: Love and War, Free Screening Nov. 8th

UNL's College of Journalism and Mass Communications presents a free screening of professor Barney McCoy’s new documentary about the life of General John "Black Jack" Pershing.

Wednesday, Nov. 8 at 7 p.m.

Mary Riepma Ross Media Arts Center

313 N. 13th St., Lincoln

Free admission. Tickets available at the Ross Box Office beginning November 1.
There will be a short discussion following the film.

BLACK JACK PERSHING: LOVE AND WAR
Directed by Bernard R. McCoy
57 minutes / 2017 / PG-13

 His name was John “Black Jack” Pershing and his roots ran deep in 20th century America. He commanded 2 million U.S. troops that helped win World War I and changed the world. America became a global superpower and General “Black Jack” Pershing his nation’s highest ranking officer. But behind Pershing’s iron exterior stood a man who endured great personal tragedy and heartbreak.

For more information, click here

Other Announcements

Humanities and Medical Practice

Rita Charon, MD, PhD addresses an important question regarding today’s medical practice in her latest article "To See the Suffering."

“Does rigorous humanities training before and/or during medical school produce physicians with consequential clinical capacities not seen in the non-humanities-trained students?”

Continue reading here

Inclusive Feminisms Discussion Series

The Inclusive Feminisms Discussion Series will have its last event of the year at Indigo Bridge on Wednesday, November 29th at 7 PM.  They'll be discussing Judaism and Feminism with speaker (and staffer) Kat Morrow and more to be announced. 

In the meantime, check out the Inclusive Feminisms podcast for more lovely local commentary and discourse.

Submit to Mangrove Journal

Mangrove Journal is only considering work from students currently enrolled in a two-year or four-year undergraduate institution at this time. 

Literary submissions should be attached as a MS Word document and art submissions should be attached as JPEGs. Submissions should be in 12-pt. Times New Roman font and should use complete tab indentations. Fiction and nonfiction entries should be double-spaced. Additionally, the file name should be the same as the title of the piece(s). For submissions of multiple pieces (poetry), each individual title separated by a semicolon in the entry name. 

In your cover letter, please provide a short bio (80 words max). including your full name, major, projected year of graduation, and the undergraduate institution where you are currently enrolled.

For more information, click here

Dennis Banks, American Indian Activist Who Helped Lead Wounded Knee Occupation, Dies at 80

"Dennis Banks, a co-founder of the American Indian Movement and a leader of the 1973 Wounded Knee occupation, has died, his family said Monday. He was 80." Continue reading here

Submit Your Stories

Share your stories with us! Send us your text and photos using our online form or email the
English Advising Intern at ENGL-AdvisingIntern@unl.edu.