Summer & Fall 2016 Courses

If you are planning to do an independent study or directed readings course that is medieval/Renaissance in focus, it can count towards your Med/Ren major/minor. Please discuss it with either Dr. Kelly Stage (Undergraduate Advisor) or Dr. Carole Levin (Graduate Advisor).


Summer 2016

HIST/MRST/WMNS 336: Saints, Witches, & Madwomen
OLDH-204
9:30-12:20pm on MTWRF (May 16 - Jun 3)
Carole Levin
Description: Image of the madwoman throughout European and American history. Emphasis on how women on the margins have been labelled in different periods as saintly, as witches, or as insane. Pre-1800 content. See the flier.

ENGL 230A: Shakespeare (301)
ANDR-37
9:30am-12:20pm on MTWRF (May 16 - Jun 3)
Stephen Buhler
Aim: To introduce students to Shakespeare’s poetry and plays, along with different ways of approaching and appreciating them. The Sonnets will serve as a starting point in understanding Shakespeare’s poetic craft, sense of dramatic character, and psychological insight. We will then explore selected plays as dramatic scripts and historical documents, as well as literary texts. Since these are dramatic scripts, we’ll thoroughly analyze short scenes the better to understand how Shakespeare draws upon actor and audience alike. We will also examine how different ages have staged or adapted Shakespeare to suit -- or to challenge -- prevailing notions of drama and entertainment. To understand them as historical documents, we’ll learn about social and political concerns in Shakespeare’s day and his sense of history; we will also see how these plays have served to illuminate subsequent ages (including our own) and their concerns. Thinking about the plays as literary texts, we’ll look at how Shakespeare both utilizes and challenges conventional ideas about genre.
Teaching Method: Lecture; in-class readings and performances; film excerpts and analysis.
Requirements: Quizzes; response papers; midterm and final examinations.
Tentative Reading List: Sonnets; The Taming of the Shrew; Henry IV, Part One; Othello; The Merchant of Venice; Henry V.

Fall 2016

Time
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
8:30-9:20am
9:30-10:45am
10:30-11:20am
11:00am-12:20pm
12:30-2:00pm
1:30-2:20pm
2:00-5:00pm
5:00-9:00pm
ENGL 489/889 is TBA on day and time

Art History

AHIS 216: Medieval Art
RH-14
2-3:15pm on Tuesday/Thursday
Alison Stewart
Description: introduction to the art of the Middle Ages from the Early Christian to Gothic periods.

AHIS 231: Baroque Art 
RH-14
12:30-1:45pm on Tuesday/Thursday
Andrea Bolland
Description: Art and architecture in Europe from 1550 to 1700.

AHIS 322: High Renaissance
RH-14
3:30-4:45pm on Tuesday/Thursday
Andrea Bolland
Description:  Introduction to the painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy from the late 15th to the mid-16th century.

AHIS 476: History of Prints
Graduate Course cross-listing: AHIS 876
WAB-209
2:30-5:00pm on Mondays
Alison Stewart
Description: Introduction to the history of prints stressing printmaking techniques, i.e., woodcut, engraving, drypoint, etching, and the makers of prints during the first 300 years of printmaking in Europe. Baldung, Goltzius, Bruegel, and Rembrandt. Major technical developments, such as the introduction of printing colored woodcuts, are included.

Classics

CLAS 307: Early Christianity**
Cross-listed as HIST 307 / REGL 307
Graduate Course cross-listing: CLAS 807 / HIST 807 / REGL 807

AVH-119
9:30-10:45am on Tuesday/Thursday
John Turner

Description: Life, literature, thought, and institutions of the Christian movement from Jesus to Constantine. A critical, historical approach to the sources in English translation and how they reflect the interaction of Christian, Jew, and pagan in late antiquity. Includes the historical Jesus vis-a-vis the Christ of Faith, the impact of Paul's thought, the formation of Christian dogma, methods of interpreting canonical and extra-canonical Christian literature, and the problem of heresy and orthodoxy.

**If you are wanting to have this course count towards a Med/Ren degree, before signing up, please talk with the professor to see if the majority of your coursework (e.g. the final project/paper) could be in the medieval period. If so, then contact either Dr. Kelly Stage (Undergraduate Advisor) or Dr. Carole Levin (Graduate Advisor) to explain to them about the coursework, to ensure it can count towards your Med/Ren degree.

English

ENGL 230: English Authors < 1800
ANDR-35
2:00-3:15pm on Tuesday/Thursday
Kelly Stage
Description: examines major British writers from Beowulf to the end of the eighteenth century, with attention given to historical background.

ENGL 230A: Shakespeare
ANDR-117
10:30-11:20am on MWF
Stephen Buhler
Description: introductory study of a representative sample of Shakespeare's works. Some films of dramatic performances may be shown.

ENGL 362: Introduction to Medieval Literature
ANDR-35
12:30-1:45pm on Tuesday/Thursday
Kelly Stage
Description: Major English works, in the original language and in translation, from Beowulf to the late Middle Ages, with a focus on Chaucer.

ENGL 364: Restoration and 18th Century Literature**
ANDR-39
10:30-11:20am on MWF
Stephen Behrendt
Description: Major English writers-such as Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson-seen in the literary, historical, and intellectual context of the period 1660-1800.

**If you are wanting to have this course count towards a Med/Ren degree, before signing up, please talk with the professor to see if the majority of your coursework (e.g. the final project/paper) could be in the medieval or Renaissance period. If so, then contact either Dr. Kelly Stage (Undergraduate Advisor) or Dr. Carole Levin (Graduate Advisor) to explain to them about the coursework, to ensure it can count towards your Med/Ren degree.

ENGL 430A: Shakespeare I, section 101: "Beyond the Bawdy"
Graduate Course cross-listing: ENGL 830A
ANDR-116
6:00-8:50pm on Thursdays
Julia Schleck
Description: (see the flier)

ENGL 489: Medieval Lit & Theology
Graduate Course cross-listing: ENGL 889
TBA
TBA
TBA
Description: The relationship between significant medieval theologies and primary medieval poets and prose masters.

History

HIST 130/130H: Premodern Europe
BURN-115
10:30-11:20am on MWF
Amy Burnett
Description:  Explores topically the essential ideas and practices that have shaped the development of Europe from the Greeks and Romans to the Enlightenment. Pre-1800 content. Credit cannot be earned in both HIST 100/HIST 100H and HIST 130/HIST 130H.

HIST 318: The Renaissance
AVH-119
1:30-2:20pm on MWF
Amy Burnett
Description: Examines the intellectual and artistic achievements of the Italian Renaissance, relating them to the political developments and social changes which occurred throughout the Italian peninsula between ca. 1300-1550 and highlighting those elements which would influence the evolution of European culture. Emphasis on the development of humanism and its role in the transition from medieval to modern values. Pre-1800 content.

HIST 989: Interdisciplinary Renaissance
OLDH-638
5:00-6:50pm on Mondays
Carole Levin
Description: Methods and state of research in the disciplines--art, music, literature, language, history, philosophy--dealing with the Renaissance. Assistance in independent reading and research in subjects related to the student¿s own research interests. Taught jointly by faculty members in art, music, theatre, English, history, classics, modern languages, and philosophy.

Medieval and Renaissance Studies

MRST 231: England to Revolution
Cross-listed as HIST 231
RVB-123
10:30-11:20am on MWF
Carole Levin
Description: Survey of English institutions, with emphasis on the emergence of a hereditary monarchy, the evolution of parliament, the development of religious institutions, the English Reformation, and the overseas expansion of the empire through the seventeenth-century revolutions. Pre-1800 content.

MRST 414: Medieval Culture
Cross-listed as HIST 414
Graduate Course cross-listing: HIST/MRST 814
JH-251
10:30-11:20am on MWF
Jessica Coope
Description: Historical context of changes in religion, literature, philosophy, and the arts, 400-1450. Pre-1800 content.

Modern Languages and Literatures

SPAN 441: Golden Age Poetry
Graduate Course cross-listing: SPAN 841

AVH-111
2:30-4:50pm on Mondays
Oscar Pereira
Description:  Examination of important forms and themes in the history of Spanish Golden Age Poetry. Emphasis on the impact of digital tools on the humanities.

Music

MUSC 365: Music History & Lit I
WMB-114
11:30-12:20pm on MWF
Anthony Bushard
Description: Music of the Middle Ages, Renaissance and Baroque. An examination of style and social context from Gregorian chant through the mid-eighteenth century. Open to music majors only.

MUSC 458: History of Opera
Graduate Course cross-listing: MUSC 858
WMB-114
8:30-9:20am on MWF
Pamela Starr
DescriptionLiterature of the opera from its prehistory and beginnings to the present.

MUSC 485: Music -- Classical Period
Graduate Course cross-listing: MUSC 885
WMB-109
11:30am-12:20pm on MWF
Pamela Starr
DescriptionForms, styles, composers, and aesthetics of the classic period.

Religion

REGL 220: Reason & Religion
CBA-104
12:30-1:20pm on MWF
Stephen Lahey
Faculty note: Course will focus on Aquinas.
MyRed description: Issues arising from the attempt to understand the human encounter with the divine. Introduces the study of philosophical theology. Significant figures from the past and contemporary approaches.

Textiles, Merchandising, and Fashion Design

TMFD 407: History of Costume**
Graduate Course cross-listing: TMFD 807
LEV-204
11:00am-12:15pm on MF
TBA
Description: Theoretical approach to the history of dress from ancient times through the twentieth century; examining dress in the context of social, economic, and artistic development of Western culture.

**If you are wanting to have this course count towards a Med/Ren degree, before signing up, please talk with the professor to see if the majority of your coursework (e.g. the final project/paper) could be in the medieval or Renaissance period. If so, then contact either Dr. Kelly Stage (Undergraduate Advisor) or Dr. Carole Levin (Graduate Advisor) to explain to them about the coursework, to ensure it can count towards your Med/Ren degree.

Theater

THEA 112H: Intro to Theater**
NRC-2109
2:00-3:15pm on Tuesday/Thursday
Ian Borden Description: Introduction to the forms and functions of theatre and dramatic literature in the historical development of Western cultural traditions. While the theatre always reflects the aesthetic and philosophical concerns of the cultural era, the objective of the course is to determine the unique aesthetics of the theatre as an art form by exploring such issues as the relationship between the literary text and the text in performance; the changing role of theatre in culture historically; the various theatre research methods (historical, critical, experimental).

**If you are wanting to have this course count towards a Med/Ren degree, before signing up, please talk with the professor to see if the majority of your coursework (e.g. the final project/paper) could be in the medieval or Renaissance period. If so, then contact either Dr. Kelly Stage (Undergraduate Advisor) or Dr. Carole Levin (Graduate Advisor) to explain to them about the coursework, to ensure it can count towards your Med/Ren degree.

THEA 335: History of Theater I**
TEMP-104
1:30-2:20pm on MWF
William Grange
Description: Theatre from Ancient Greece through Elizabethan period.

**If you are wanting to have this course count towards a Med/Ren degree, before signing up, please talk with the professor to see if the majority of your coursework (e.g. the final project/paper) could be in the medieval or Renaissance period. If so, then contact either Dr. Kelly Stage (Undergraduate Advisor) or Dr. Carole Levin (Graduate Advisor) to explain to them about the coursework, to ensure it can count towards your Med/Ren degree.